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Education

  • Antioch pumpkin patch full of fall fun, learning

    Indian Land Elementary School students filed off the bus Thursday into a field with hundreds of pumpkins at Antioch Baptist Church’s seventh-annual Great Pumpkin Patch.

    LeighAnn Edmondson and Tiffany Evans’ special-needs classes ran straight to the pumpkins sitting on pallets, tables and bleachers.

    Edmondson said her class has learned about the lifecycle and different sizes and colors of pumpkins.

  • Indian Land accounts for all growth in local schools

    The number of students attending Indian Land schools has increased more than 10 percent since this time last year, while the population of most of the county’s other schools has declined slightly.
    Of the county’s four high schools, only Indian Land High increased its student body from last school year.
    Indian Land’s school growth is driven mostly by the Panhandle’s two elementary schools.

  • Irma make-up day Oct. 9

    The Lancaster County School District has scheduled Oct. 9 as a make-up day for the day missed because of Hurricane Irma.
    School was canceled Sept. 11 as winds and rain from Irma passed through the Palmetto State.
    Oct. 9 was the next day students were not scheduled to be in school. It had been had been planned as a teacher workday.
    “We believe it’s important to use it as a make-up day,” said LCSD Superintendent Jonathan Phipps. “We still face the possibility of winter weather and more missed days.”

  • Library’s summer readers help ‘Build a Better World’

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    Nearly 2,000 readers in Lancaster County – signed up to “Build a Better World” at the annual summer reading program at the Lancaster, Del Webb and Kershaw libraries. 

    Held June 1-July 28, the building-themed event included patrons of all ages who attended special events and registered to read books and win prizes.

  • Tracing activism, celebrating culture

    From release

    Native Americans’ pursuit of political, economic and civil rights will be the main focus as USC Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center hosts its 13th-annual Native American Studies Week in mid-March.

  • School board sets next year’s calendar

    The Lancaster County School Board unanimously approved the 2018-19 school calendar this week, with first semester not ending until after winter break.
    The board was not happy about that.
    “All we would need is five days,” said board Chairman Bobby Parker. “I wish I had said this before, but talk to your legislators – we need them here.”

  • Attendance zones finalized for Panhandle elementaries

    The Lancaster County school board has approved changes in elementary attendance zones needed to accommodate the new Van Wyck Elementary School.
    The zones split the Panhandle among Harrisburg, Indian Land and Van Wyck elementaries. The proposed zones were originally brought before the board Jan. 16.
    Students who live north of S.C. 160 to the state line are in the Harrisburg zone. Those south of 160 and north of Jim Wilson Road will attend Indian land Elementary. And those from Jim Wilson Road south to S.C. 5 will go to the new Van Wyck Elementary School.

  • New school gets a name: Van Wyck Elementary

    The new campus that opens in the Panhandle this fall will be named Van Wyck Elementary School.
    The Lancaster County school board approved the name unanimously Tuesday night. The school’s mascot will be the Braves, and its colors will match the Indian Land middle and high schools’ blue, gold and white.
    “There was one name that just stuck out overwhelmingly that people voted for, and there was no contest that the name for the school should be Van Wyck Elementary School,” said Steven Puckett, the principal of the new school.

  • Security upgrades under way

    All Lancaster County school lobbies have been reconfigured to prevent unauthorized entry, school officials said Thursday, and one-button lockdowns are in place at all Indian Land and Buford campuses.
    Lancaster and Kershaw schools are still receiving the security upgrades that are part of the $199 million bond issue approved by voters in 2016. The improvements include new classroom doors that can be secured from the inside.

  • IL high school will cost more, hold more kids

    The Lancaster County school board on Saturday voted to accept a $90.4 million construction bid for the new Indian Land High School – $10 million more than originally expected.
    The board intends to award the bid to Cleveland Construction of Charlotte after a 15-day protest period for other bidders.
    School district officials had estimated in 2016 that the construction would cost $80.9 million. The Charlotte-area’s booming construction market contributed to the higher cost, as did the district’s decision to make the building larger than planned.