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Education

  • 1892 artifact turns up in Moore’s office

    Gene Moore, who will retire next month as Lancaster County school superintendent, was packing up his office Thursday and came across a puzzling 125-year-old artifact.
    Underneath a box atop a cabinet, he found a school attendance ledger dated 1892.
    “I was cleaning stuff out and was like, ‘Whoa, what is that?’” Moore said Thursday.
    In his 12 years as superintendent, Moore has been known for keeping an orderly office, but he had never come across the ledger before.

  • Governor vetoes school bus funding

    Lancaster County School District and state education officials are hoping the General Assembly will override Gov. Henry McMaster’s veto of $20.5 million in funding for new school buses.
    The money is part of a $28.9 million allocation that would pay for the state to buy or lease more than 400 new school buses, according to the S.C. Department of Education.

  • CCA graduates its 21st class, celebrates mortgage-burning

    From release

  • Cap-and-gown ecstasy

    Rochelle Baxter led 26 adult-ed graduates into the Lancaster High School auditorium Wednesday night to celebrate amid an audience of 300 who braved torrential rains, winds and even a tornado warning to attend the ceremony.

  • Phipps facing new challenges at much bigger school district

    Dr. Jonathan Phipps is making the leap to a school district four times the size of Abbeville County’s, and with vastly different problems.
    In rural Abbeville, his biggest challenge as superintendent was dealing with tight budgets and crumbling buildings from the 1950s. In Lancaster, his biggest job will be constructing new schools fast enough to keep pace with the Panhandle’s explosive growth.

  • School board selects Phipps

    The Lancaster County school board voted Tuesday night to hire Dr. Jonathan Phipps as the district’s next superintendent.
    The vote was 6-1, with only board member Tyrom Faulkner voting against Phipps.
    Phipps, 44, is superintendent of the Abbeville County School District, where he’s served since leaving Lancaster County’s schools in 2014. He began his career in Lancaster and worked here for 19 years.

  • 2nd finalist makes pitch, shakes hands

    The second Lancaster County School District superintendent finalist visited Lancaster on Thursday and had the opportunity to meet the community and district staff.
    Dr. Carlotta Redish, 52, assistant superintendent for human resources at Spartanburg School District 7, said she is grateful for the chance to meet the county’s students, parents, community members and district staff.

  • Southside teacher on paid leave after briefly dragging 2-year-old

    A teacher at Southside Early Childhood Center has been placed on paid administrative leave after video evidence showed her dragging a 2-year-old across a classroom.
    The tape showed Tiara Wade, 31, dragging the toddler by the arms “a short distance” two times on Monday afternoon, according to a Lancaster Police Department report.
    Bryan Vaughn, Lancaster County School District safety and transportation director, said school personnel became aware of the incident later while reviewing video from the classroom.

  • Dr. Phipps back in Lancaster, where he served for 19 years

    Dr. Jonathan Phipps, a superintendent finalist for the Lancaster County School District, saw many familiar faces Monday as he met with the school board and educators and fielded questions from a citizens’ panel.
    Phipps, who spent 19 years as a Lancaster County educator before becoming superintendent of Abbeville schools in 2014, was the first of three LCSD superintendent finalists to have an individual meet and greet with district staff and the community.

  • Finalist Redish sued Cherokee schools

    One of the three Lancaster County School District superintendent finalists filed a federal racial discrimination lawsuit against the Cherokee County School District in 2013 after not being promoted to superintendent there.
    Dr. Carlotta Redish, who is black, filed the suit in January 2013, nearly eight months after filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleging racial discrimination, retaliation and a hostile work environment, according to the lawsuit.