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Education

  • New classes on books for ’09-’10

    Dennis Bivins, a teacher at Indian Land High School, is excited about the new classes that will soon come into the fold.

    Starting in the 2009-10 school year, Indian Land High will offer courses in American sign language, human body systems and principles of biomedical technology.

    The latter two courses will be part of ILHS’ Project Lead The Way (PLTW) initiative, which aims to offer students a rigorous educational experience in science and engineering.

  • Spelling champ crowned

    There was a hotly contested duel between two top-notch spellers last week in Lancaster.

    Noah Bradley and David Johnson went back and forth, round after round, trying to best the other to become the champion of the Lancaster County School District spelling bee.

    The contest was Tuesday at the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    Johnson, a sixth-grader at Andrew Jackson Middle School captured the district title, outlasting Bradley, an A.R. Rucker Middle School sixth-grader.

  • It’s never too late to learn

    When Christine Barrett stepped on the campus of North Carolina A&T State University, she was taking classes with people nearly 60 years younger.

    It didn’t bother the 80-year-old Gastonia, N.C., resident that she was old enough to be many of her classmates’ grandmother. She was thrilled to have the chance to attend college.

    Now with a high school diploma and college degree under her belt, Barrett stands as an example that you can achieve your biggest goals if you have faith and work hard.

  • 18 educators earn National Board certification

    Four teachers at Buford Middle School say if it wasn’t for teamwork and extended support, they wouldn’t have been able to accomplish their most recent feat.

    Karen Dingler, Lisa Hallman, Paige Johnson and Mary Beth Mize are among 18 teachers in the Lancaster County School District who earned certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

    National Board certification is regarded as one of the highest honors in the education profession.

  • Data on local youth given at breakfast

    Did you know that since 2003, underage drinking in Lancaster County has decreased 29 percent and marijuana use is down 33 percent?

    But during that same time, a study found that 22 percent of stores sold tobacco to underage customers.

    A wealth of local statistics, good and bad, related to local teen behavior was shared Friday morning at the second annual Lancaster County Legislative Breakfast.

  • ILMS student’s art in 2009 calendar

    INDIAN LAND – The 2009 Safe Kids South Carolina calendar will include artwork by Indian Land Middle School sixth-grader Brandon Sellers.

    A statewide competition was held to select 13 entries for the annual calendar that addresses child safety topics.

    Sellers’ art was selected for January, which is scald and burn prevention month.

    His drawing depicts a cigarette lighter and a flame with the tagline “Little Lighters Make Big Fires.”

    Sellers said he decided to work on a fire safety theme because he knew he could draw flames well.

  • Eastside grads get life advice

    The latest graduates of Eastside Academy left their commencement ceremony Monday evening with a wealth of knowledge they can carry with them for the rest of their lives.

    Gabrielle Barrett was the guest speaker at Eastside’s semester graduation ceremony.

    Barrett, the district’s hearing officer for expulsions and truancy cases, spoke to the five graduating students and their families about bumps, barriers and boxes.

  • Students take part in poetry contest

    Written poetry came alive earlier this month as local high school students competed in a district-wide poetry contest at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    One by one, students took to the stage at Bundy Auditorium and gave their best oral presentation of famous poems.

    Keigan Woodhart, a senior at Buford High School, came out on top.

  • Reaching for the stars

    Creative sketches and unique color schemes make up the dozens of paper stars that will soon adorn the halls at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School.

    The students there have been asked to “shoot for the stars” – to consider their ultimate goals and transfer those dreams to paper.

    One fifth-grade class had their dreams all mapped out.

    Karla Lopez’s dream is for her two older siblings to be able to move from Mexico and live with her in the United States. She wants to “be a leader” and help immigrants get Social Security.

  • Parents gain knowledge at ILMS seminar

    INDIAN LAND – Parents in the Panhandle received a lot of insight Nov. 20 regarding issues that may be bothersome to their children.

    Indian Land Middle School hosted a parent seminar that shed light on four topics – peer pressure, maturing bodies, eating disorders and gangs.

    Local professionals, as well as guests from Charlotte, facilitated the four sessions.

    Peer pressure