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Education

  • Eastside grads get life advice

    The latest graduates of Eastside Academy left their commencement ceremony Monday evening with a wealth of knowledge they can carry with them for the rest of their lives.

    Gabrielle Barrett was the guest speaker at Eastside’s semester graduation ceremony.

    Barrett, the district’s hearing officer for expulsions and truancy cases, spoke to the five graduating students and their families about bumps, barriers and boxes.

  • Students take part in poetry contest

    Written poetry came alive earlier this month as local high school students competed in a district-wide poetry contest at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    One by one, students took to the stage at Bundy Auditorium and gave their best oral presentation of famous poems.

    Keigan Woodhart, a senior at Buford High School, came out on top.

  • Reaching for the stars

    Creative sketches and unique color schemes make up the dozens of paper stars that will soon adorn the halls at Brooklyn Springs Elementary School.

    The students there have been asked to “shoot for the stars” – to consider their ultimate goals and transfer those dreams to paper.

    One fifth-grade class had their dreams all mapped out.

    Karla Lopez’s dream is for her two older siblings to be able to move from Mexico and live with her in the United States. She wants to “be a leader” and help immigrants get Social Security.

  • Parents gain knowledge at ILMS seminar

    INDIAN LAND – Parents in the Panhandle received a lot of insight Nov. 20 regarding issues that may be bothersome to their children.

    Indian Land Middle School hosted a parent seminar that shed light on four topics – peer pressure, maturing bodies, eating disorders and gangs.

    Local professionals, as well as guests from Charlotte, facilitated the four sessions.

    Peer pressure

  • USCL recognizes scholarship winners; thanks donors at event

    You may think of the University of South Carolina’s main campus as the sun and all the university’s branches as planets that revolve around it.

    Dr. Harris Pastides, who became USC’s 28th president earlier this year, wants to defuse that thought. He sees each campus as an equal star that helps create a unique constellation.

    One of those stars, the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, continues to shine bright, as officials say it offers more scholarships than any other USC branch besides the main campus.

  • Gene Moore receives Wingate’s Distinguished Alumni Award

    Dr. Gene Moore often likes to stay in the background – shying away from the spotlight, though not hesitating to speak up when something needs to be said.  

    Given his humble nature, local school board members believed Moore, the Lancaster County School District superintendent, would have tried to prevent a special recognition at the most recent board meeting.

  • Living history speaks at AJ Middle School

    Manfred Katz doesn’t want to see the day when people will doubt the Holocaust ever existed.

    Katz thinks younger generations may not believe that millions of Jews were forced to live in sub-human conditions. He believes people may doubt that a widespread program was used for nearly five years simply to eliminate one group of people.

    That fear of disbelief has driven Katz to tell his story.