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Education

  • USCL holds scholarship luncheon

    Linda Blalock believes a scholarship bearing the name of her father and husband is the perfect way to memorialize them.

    She recalls how her father, the late Andy Clough, didn’t have a chance to go to college but made sure his children were afforded that opportunity.

    Blalock, a former teacher, said that emphasis on education remained at the forefront in her life and, years later, inspired her to create the Clough Blalock Memorial Scholarship – in memory of her father and late husband, Jacky Blalock.

  • What is The Tribe?

    INDIAN LAND – What started as a simple homework assignment has blossomed into a full-fledged school spirit club at Indian Land High School.

    As part of an assignment in her advanced-placement English class last year, then-junior Taylor Altier was asked to write a proposal about what she would change at her school. Altier, 17, already had an idea about what could be improved.

  • Author mentors young writers

    INDIAN LAND – A few young aspiring writers recently got the chance to receive one-on-one mentorship from a nationally known author.

    Caroline B. Cooney, who has written dozens of books for teenagers, worked with a select group of students at Indian Land Middle and Indian Land High schools on two separate days earlier this month.

    Cooney, now a Sun City Carolina Lakes resident, saw the high school students Nov. 3 and the middle school students Tuesday. The workshop sessions were held at the Del Webb Library at Indian Land.

  • IL, AJ high bands compete in state finals

    The marching bands at Indian Land High and Andrew Jackson High schools placed sixth and 12th, respectively, at their state finals competitions on Oct. 31.

    Indian Land High’s show theme this year featured a mixture of different music styles and was called “Danse.”

    Director Mathew Willis said the band ended the season at state finals with a strong performance.

  • Dingler shares love of reading

    To Karen Dingler, nouns, verbs and adjectives are more than just words.

    They’re ingredients that allow you to go from one place to another – opening up a world you’ve never seen before.

    Dingler tries to share that passion with her students in hopes they’ll become lifelong readers. And, apparently, she’s doing a good job.

    Dingler, an English teacher at Buford Middle School, is the districtwide winner of the 2009 Celebrate Great Teaching award. It’s the highest honor the Lancaster County School District gives to its educators.

  • Meteorologist visits Erwin Elementary fourth-graders

    Enter Kelly Franson’s world – one made up of ever-changing forecasts and weather instruments many people can’t pronounce.

    Franson, a meteorologist with WBTV channel 3 in Charlotte, visited Erwin Elementary School on Oct. 14, when she talked to fourth-graders about her career in weather.

    An Idaho native, Franson has been working at WBTV for about two years. Before then, she had worked at two TV stations in her home state.  

  • Bryan Coburn brought a sense of humor and enthusiasm to the stage that captivated the audience Tuesday at the Lancaster High School auditorium.

    Coburn, the 2009 S.C. Teacher of the Year, was guest speaker during the Lancaster County School District’s opening assembly for teachers.

    Coburn told the crowd it’s his dedication and toughness that really helps him be effective.

  • When Robyn Blackmon was a young child, she’d line up her teddy bears and dolls and teach them what she’d learned in school that day.

    It was during those early years that the Great Falls native knew she wanted to be an educator.

    Fast forward to 2009, and now she’s being recognized for being one of the best in the profession in Lancaster County.

    Blackmon, a kindergarten teacher at North Elementary School, is the year’s Celebrate Great Teaching winner for the elementary level in the Lancaster County School District.

  • Adams shares love of math

    INDIAN LAND – Posters in Paula Adams’ classroom feature a key phrase: “We all use math every day.”

    Adams, a math teacher at Indian Land High School, wants her students to know that math will be a large part of their daily lives, even if they don’t pursue careers working closely with numbers.

    One of her aims is to help prepare her students for the real world.

  • Back to the books for about 1,800 USCL students

    Dennis Dunham sat in the lounge area in Starr Hall reviewing his schedule, wondering what he’s going to do with the dead time between his classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

    Dunham, a sophomore at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster, is taking 14 hours this semester. Tuesdays and Thursdays will be inconvenient, as he has a nearly four-hour gap in between classes.