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Education

  • Marcus Lattimore, Tahj Boyd meet with Rucker 8th graders

    Eighth-grade athletes from A.R. Rucker Middle School had the opportunity to hear from former college athletes and professionals during the Marcus Lattimore Foundation Leadership Academy in Columbia on Wednesday.

    “This was a great opportunity for these young men,” said Lamont Elder, A.R. Rucker’s athletic director. “They were able to hear about the reality of academics versus athletics.”

  • Reading railroad pulls into VW

    Ashley Lowrimore

    For The Lancaster News

    All aboard! On Nov. 13, the Van Wyck Community Development Club officially established its train-themed Little Free Library, the first of its kind in the Panhandle.  

  • A.R. Rucker celebrates its readers with tailgate party

    A.R. Rucker Middle School students gathered in the library on Monday for a tailgate party to celebrate 75 students who have read six books this semester and a teacher who won $500 through the state’s “Read Your Way to the Big Game” contest.

    Students, dressed in Clemson and University of South Carolina gear, enjoyed nachos, cupcakes and the game of corn hole.

  • IL residents ‘experience literacy in a fun way’

    Indian Land High School hosted its second-annual Family Literacy Night on Friday, bringing out nearly 500 local residents for a book fair, food truck and the Lancaster County mobile library.

    ILHS’s gym was full of booths displaying student projects, literacy games and reading strategies.

  • Teacher calls for more black men in classrooms

    Fifth-grade teacher C.T. Kirk has goals for his students, and a goal for the school system to put more black men in teaching positions.

    Kirk is an author and pastor at Sanctuary of Life Outreach Center in Rock Hill. He said he plans to use those platforms as tools to encourage African-American men to become teachers.

  • Free college application day

    Andrew Jackson, Buford and Indian Land high school seniors had the opportunity to apply to S.C. colleges for free this week during school hours.
    Students could apply to 32 colleges, which included two- and four-year schools. Colleges offer students application fee waivers during the fall through SCCANGO, a campaign to promote a college-going culture.

  • Duke Energy funding class projects

    Teachers are receiving a boost from Duke Energy for classroom supplies that will assist with literacy and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) projects.
    Duke has partnered with DonorsChoose.org to match dollar-for-dollar eligible supplies up to $250.
    Teachers can create a project online by entering a list of eligible materials they need up to $500. Each online page gives a teacher’s description of his or her students and project as well as a breakdown of what items the funds will supply.

  • Poet brings creativity to middle schoolers

    A crowd of seventh graders sits enthralled as Glenis Redmond floods the room with passion and history, her animated voice and hands telling stories that spark their creativity.
    She scans their faces through red cat-eye glasses. She describes her 109-year-old grandmother, who smoked cigarettes and caught the long ashes in her hand when they fell.
    Poet Glenis Redmond visited South Middle School and the University of South Carolina Lancaster this week to give lessons and share her poetry with seventh grade students from Lancaster County schools.

  • Sending STEM students to college

    If you don’t apply to a college, you will never know if it might have accepted you. That’s the mindset of retired educator Dr. Carolyn Powell as she works to send high school students to college.
    Powell has been involved in education consulting for nearly 30 years and has a special interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) students.
    Since retiring in 2014, Powell has volunteered her time and expertise to students who want college advice.

  • New club: Fun, fellowship, pride for young people with disabilities

    Hoping to help new friends reach their goals, junior Grace Trumpower is bringing a new club for teens and young adults with disabilities to Indian Land High School.
    The club, EQUIP, is part of Able South Carolina, a self-empowerment nonprofit group. EQUIP, which will hold its first ILHS meeting this week, is for individuals with disabilities ages 13 through 28.
    “People with disabilities are often severely underestimated…,” Trumpower said. “That is not fair.”