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Education

  • LHS senior is district’s 1st registered apprentice

    A Lancaster High student has recently become the Lancaster County School District’s first registered apprentice.

    RanQuon Shropshire, 18, will be working at the school district’s bus shop on Kershaw Camden Highway starting in January.

    “I’m most excited about being able to get hands-on experience,” Shropshire said. “I hope to accomplish getting a lot of the buses running so they can use them.”

    Shropshire said he enjoys working on engines. 

  • ILHS gets renewed $10K grant

    Indian Land High School has received a $10,000 grant for its automotive technology program for the third year in a row.
    The Real Tools for Schools grant from Ingersoll Rand has been given to the school each year since 2015 in an effort to improve the automotive vocational classes. The grant can be used to update equipment, to purchase supplies or for instructor training and curriculum.

  • District’s ACT average still below state scores

    ACT test results are out for South Carolina’s class of 2018, and the Lancaster County School District average is slightly lower than the state average, much like last year’s scores.
    State Education Superintendent Molly Spearman warned that the scores might not be accurate due to possible testing system failures, but local school officials said Lancaster County’s numbers are correct.

  • Memories from long-closed Dobson Elementary School

    This sixth-grade class at now-closed Dobson Elementary School was photographed 50 years ago.

  • ILMS wins U.S. reading contest, logs 177,442 minutes in October

    The number 177,442 can stand for many different things.
    At Indian Land Middle School, it’s the number of minutes students read on Chromebooks during October, landing them first place in the national 2017 LightSail Launch Challenge.
    The school received $3,000 to spend on e-books for students to read through the LightSail app on Chromebooks.
    “We feel pretty great about winning, but most importantly our students were growing and learning and they were excited to read,” said ILM curriculum director Cheryl Fleischman.

  • AJ and IL bands finish strong in championship competitions

    Indian Land and Andrew Jackson high schools both placed in the top 10 at Saturday’s 2017 state marching band championship at Spring Valley High in Columbia.
    AJ placed sixth in the AA division, Indian Land seventh in AAA. Each school competed against 15 other bands in their class.
    Andrew Jackson also received a superior rating.
    AJ band director Marshall Woody said this year is the best the Volunteer regiment has ever had.

  • Teacher soaks in Japanese culture

    Ashley Lowrimore
    For The Lancaster News

    Indian Land High School teacher Matthew Hodge is no stranger to the Land of the Rising Sun.
    As a Japanese teacher and a former four-year resident of Osaka and Kyoto, Hodge is fluent in the language and familiar with the culture.
    Last year, he visited Japan with his wife and three daughters. This summer, Hodge had the opportunity to visit the country again with his 13-year-old daughter, Aestas.

  • AJ band grand champs at 9-school competition

    Andrew Jackson High’s band received several honors in this year’s River Bluff Swamp Classic competition on Sept. 30.

    Competing in the AA Class against eight other schools, the Volunteers were awarded first place in the music, visual, percussion and overall general effect categories. The band also walked away finishing first in their class and were named grand champions.

    AJH band director Marshall Woody said he couldn’t ask for a better group of students.

  • AME Zion youth oratory winners

    From release

    Seventeen young people, ages 12-18, participated in the annual Oratorical Expose held during September’s 98th Session of the Lancaster District AME Zion Church Conference.

    Before a standing-room only congregation at Mt. Tabor AME Zion Church, students spoke on topics such as the pros and cons of social media, reasons young people are leaving the church and suggestions to encourage them to stay, and what “#blacklivesmatter” means to them.

  • Antioch pumpkin patch full of fall fun, learning

    Indian Land Elementary School students filed off the bus Thursday into a field with hundreds of pumpkins at Antioch Baptist Church’s seventh-annual Great Pumpkin Patch.

    LeighAnn Edmondson and Tiffany Evans’ special-needs classes ran straight to the pumpkins sitting on pallets, tables and bleachers.

    Edmondson said her class has learned about the lifecycle and different sizes and colors of pumpkins.