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Education

  • Board OKs 10-point grading for all schools

    The 10-point grading scale, mandated by the state last month for high schools, will take effect for all Lancaster County public schools beginning with the 2016-17 school year, the Lancaster County school board announced Tuesday night.
    “We would like to have the consistency across the board in the grading system,” Lancaster school Superintendent Gene Moore said.
    When school starts in August, the current 7-point scale will stop and the 10-point will begin. Parents will receive written notice with final report cards this semester.

  • Spearman: Federal directive won’t change much in S.C.

    Little is expected to change in S.C. public schools in response to the recent directive from the Obama administration on the civil rights of transgender students, according to state Education Superintendent Molly Spearman.
    The federal directive, in the form of a May 13 letter from the Justice and Education departments, told public schools to allow transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice. The Obama administration said the letter was in response to school leaders seeking direction on the matter.

  • Schools honor top students and educators

    Lancaster County School District honored its finest students and educators during the 19th-annual Celebration of Excellence banquets held this week at the Second Baptist Church Family Ministry Center.
    “I really enjoy joining you in celebrating great things these students do in classrooms across our district. These students truly represent excellence in academics,”  said Dr. Gene Moore, district superintendent.

  • Budget plan gives teachers 2% raise

    Lancaster County teachers would get 2 percent raises for the 2016-17 school year – their first since 2013 – under the school district’s proposed budget.
    The Lancaster County school board met and reviewed the proposed $97.9 million budget May 2, said Tony Walker, the district’s chief financial officer. The school budget is based on the state’s projected budget, which won’t be complete until the end of June. State law requires the schools’ budget to be final by July 1.

  • 76 graduates flip tassels at USCL

    Walking across the stage of the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium wasn’t optional for Joseph Hammond on Saturday.
    It was something he had to do.
    After going to school part-time since 2008 to earn a bachelor’s degree, the summa cum laude graduate enjoyed every second of shaking hands with USCL Dean Walt Collins.
    “This day means a lot, but it means even more for my family,” said Hammond, a father of two, who works at Resolute Forest Products in Catawba.

  • School board OKs bond sale

    The Lancaster County school board met Tuesday night for the first time since the bond referendum passed last month, approving $199 million for school construction, safety and technology projects. 

    The board unanimously approved the resolutions to declare the results of the bond referendum and to allow the issuance and sale of the bonds.  

  • Art with class

    From Release

    Lancaster-based sculptor Bob Doster recently installed a student-made metal sculpture at Duncan Elementary School in Spartanburg. The circular design utilized student self-portraits standing beside each other. 

    Doster was the artist in residence at the school as part of Chapman Cultural Center’s Arts Advantage program.

  • High schools shift to 10-pt grading system

    Beginning with the 2016-17 school year, South Carolina’s high school students will be graded on a 10-point scale. The South Carolina Board of Education unanimously voted last week to make the change from the current 7-point scale.
    State Superintendent Molly Spearman said in a release the shift to a 10-point scale will level the playing field for Palmetto State high schoolers.

  • USCL students celebrate Earth Day

    Polar bears, mini-greenhouses and human burial pods were among the projects featured this week at the annual Earth Day Event at USC Lancaster, as Geology 103 students ended the semester with proposals for a brighter future.  
    “This is my environmental geology class,” said Instructor Lynette Martek, surveying the crowded classroom. “These are the people who will save the Earth.”

  • USCL honors OSPy winners

    The TRiO program at USCL honored its past and its finest at the annual OSPy (Opportunity Scholars Program) awards ceremony on Wednesday. Former TRiO Director Thelathia “Thee” Bailey was honored for her years of service, and top honors for Best All-Around Student went to Kera Stroner.   
    Students and staff filled the special events room in the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building, which was decorated with a Mardi Gras theme. Smooth jazz filled the air, adding a feeling of celebration.