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Business

  • 50-flavor ice cream truck keeps Cannon busy

    Amanda Harris

    Special to The Lancaster News

    When his unique take on “Pop Goes the Weasel” starts to play, residents know immediately that Roger Cannon’s ice cream truck is headed their way. 

    “I’ve got to jazz it up a little bit,” he said.

    A Fort Lawn resident, Cannon converted an old hospital supply van into an ice cream truck in April, renewing a dream he began years ago. 

  • Rebound begins overnight stays, only such program in the state

    Rebound Behavioral Health, which treats chemical dependency and mental illness in adults, has begun offering overnight lodging to the company's day patients.

    Dan Anderson, Rebound’s director of business development, said the “partial hospitalization program” at the facility near Van Wyck will help patients focus on recovery rather than dealing with transportation issues or the distraction of a dysfunctional home. 

  • 4 new businesses coming to IL’s Cross Creek center

    Indian Land’s Cross Creek shopping center has grown steadily since Publix opened there in late 2012, and now four new businesses are set to open at the center in the coming months.

    Under construction on three outparcels at the front of the shopping center are an NTB auto-care shop, an Arby’s restaurant and a Doctors Care medical offices, said York Development Group owner Doug Baumgartner. 

  • Column: Start your cyber-security scorecard

    Cyber security is like exercise. It is not a destination. It’s a way of life.

    In this column, I want to exercise your cyber-security awareness and pinpoint ways to identify, protect, detect and respond to potential threats you face in your daily activities and device interaction with the internet.

  • Tree Tops celebrates grand opening

    Lennar Charlotte celebrated the grand opening of its Tree Tops active adult community last month during an event that highlighted the community’s connection to nature and uncommon approach.

    The Oct. 15 event offered the first public look at a project that began with a tumultuous start about two years ago amid public outcry from Van Wyck residents.

  • Central Wire expands Lancaster plant

    From release

    Central Wire Inc. will spend $2 million expanding its Lancaster County manufacturing operation, creating 18 new jobs at the plant off Riverside Road.
    The Lancaster facility, at 1552 Cedar Pines Lake Road, now employ 32 workers. The expansion will add two state-of-the-art welding wire manufacturing lines.

  • Women’s Enrichment Center's Humble Abode empowers women

    The Women’s Enrichment Center held the grand opening Monday for its new Humble Abode retail store and sewing room, which is designed to be self-sustaining and to teach women a trade that’s becoming a rarity.

    WEC Humble Abode, at 311A N. Main St. in Lancaster, works with local businesses and individuals who request custom-made products. 

  • Why is that peach tree full of paper bags? It’s organic

    Scott Miller
    Clemson University

    CLEMSON – More Southeastern peaches will be grown organically thanks to a $1 million federal grant awarded to Clemson University.
    Clemson pomologist Juan Carlos Melgar and pathologist Guido Schnabel are tying paper bags on peaches as they grow on trees, an unconventional method of protecting them from insects and disease while reducing reliance on pesticides. The peaches are bagged when the fruits are young and small.

  • Hospital launches telemedicine program

    Springs Memorial Hospital went live Tuesday with a telemedicine program for its intensive and critical care units that gives patients access to doctors through a television screen 24/7.
    With the push of a button, a patient or hospital staffers can have a two-way conversation with a doctor within 60 seconds.
    Springs Memorial has 10 ICU rooms and 10 CCU rooms, which are now all equipped with a television screen and ceiling camera.

  • Open enrollment time for many health plans

    It’s that time of the year again when people are allowed to make changes to their health insurance plans for the upcoming year. It’s also that time of year when people stress and procrastinate making these decisions.
    A best practice is to evaluate how your current plan has performed in 2016 and to make changes (if needed) to improve your plan for 2017.