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Business

  • Software firm breaks ground in IL

    INDIAN LAND – After years of planning, a software company has broken ground for its new Indian Land headquarters.
    Verian Technologies, a provider of software designed to help companies better manage their budgets and finances, began preparing the future location of its new building during the last week of October.

  • Downtown preps for arts draw

    The Lancaster County Council of the Arts annual Dark Arts Draw and adult costume contest is this Friday at the Springs House, 201 W. Gay St., Lancaster.
    The costume contest has three categories:  Best Dressed Man, Best Dressed Woman and Best Dressed Couple.
    The event starts at 5:30 p.m., with live music provided by jazz guitarist Ken Blinko. An exhibit featuring the “dark art” of various local and regional artists will be on display, and refreshments will be served.

  • Hospital using new technology for improved clinical communication

    Springs Memorial Hospital, as part of its commitment to a better patient experience, implemented the Vocera Communication System on Sept. 20.  
    The person-to-person communication system improves communication and processes for care providers, allowing them to spend more time at the patient’s side.

  • Romarco breaks ground for lab

    KERSHAW – Diane Garrett of Romarco Minerals said she plans for her company to be in Kershaw for decades to come.

    Romarco Minerals is drilling at Haile Gold Mine in Kershaw, and will soon begin construction of a laboratory. The 7,500-square-foot lab will house 12 employees, including a team of analytical technicians, said Jim Wickens, process manager for Haile Gold Mine.

  • Think Lancaster First campaign aims to help local businesses

    Dean Faile, president of the Lancaster County Chamber of Commerce, hopes that group’s new Think Lancaster First marketing campaign can help give local businesses a better chance to stay open.

    The campaign, which was launched Sept. 28, will feature posters, fliers and other materials encouraging Lancaster County residents to think about Lancaster County businesses before heading outside the county to shop, dine or get other services.

    Faile believes the campaign is a “component of a strategy” that can prevent local small businesses from closing.

  • Can downtown thrive?

    Fresh food at affordable prices was the name of the game at Wagz & Wishes in downtown Lancaster.

    The South Main Street deli-cafe opened in October 2008 and quickly developed a following of customers who came to enjoy their soups, sandwiches, salads, coffees and made-from-scratch baked goods.

    Its laid-back atmosphere was a major attraction, too.

    “Downtown was missing a place to eat and socially gather,” owner Dawn Wagner said. “It became a nice social hub for Lancaster.”

  • Home Depot associates plant beds at White Oak Manor

    September is Celebration of Service month at The Home Depot, and this year’s theme is “30 Days of Green.”

    On Sept. 16, seven associates from the Lancaster Home Depot met at White Oak Manor in Lancaster to plant flowers and vegetables for the residents of the assisted-living facility. Store manager Eric Tweddle, Lynette Waid (a Home Depot team captain), Tiffany Bunton, Mandy Cauthen, Joshua Glenn, Daisy Prosser and Patrick Williams arrived eager to complete the beautification work.

  • Robinson: Women make a difference at her law firm

    Lancaster attorney Elizabeth Robinson came from a family of teachers.

    She majored in special education and later attended law school at the University of South Carolina  with the hopes of becoming an advocate for children with special needs.

    But when she finished law school, Robinson couldn’t find a job in the specialty she wanted.

    She began researching and found that only two law firms represent parents of children with disabilities in due-process actions.

  • Business on the bypass

    Bo Thai Cuisine had its regular, devoted customers.

    But the exotic eatery, known for its fresh stir fry dishes and flavorful curries, recently closed its doors on S.C. 9 Bypass after almost three years of business.

    A “Sorry, we’re closed” sign hangs in one window, a “For sale” sign in another.

    Those may be signs of the times.

    Another restaurant on the S.C. 9 Bypass with a more familiar name, Dairy Queen, announced its closing with a sign, too.

  • Wanted: new supervisor for Lancaster airport

    For the second time in a year, the administration at the Lancaster County Airport is changing.

    Sandy Laubscher, a county employee who took over as airport supervisor in December, is stepping down from the post today to accept a management position at a Rock Hill company.

    Laubscher took over at the airport after Lancaster Aviation, a private business that oversaw the day-to-day operations at the airport for more than six years, shut down its operations there at the end of 2009.