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Today's Features

  • Sometimes, the best recipes go through a lot of hands before making it to the table.

    This version of Pumpkin Mousse is a good example of that.

    Kimberly Gulledge of the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life sent me a Thanksgiving card that included the recipe.

    Suddenly, the light bulb above my head went off.

    It seems that Wal-Mart had donated some leftover pumpkins to the culinary arts class at Lancaster High School.

  • My friend in Texas sent me a link to a puppy cam on Nov. 7.  Click here for the puppy cam.

    Most days since then, I've tuned in from time to time throughout the day to watch the little shiba inus playing with their plush jack-o-laterns, carrots and even a stuffed trout.

    Ocassionally, a man with tattoos on his arms wearing black pants reaches in to handle the puppies, or clean up their messes.

  • Just before the start of every University of South Carolina home football game, Jessica Bradburn gets caught up in moment as the strains of “Also Sprach Zarathustra” (the theme to “2001: A Space Odyssey”) roar over the public address amid 80,000-plus screaming fans.

    She has one of the best vantage points in Williams Brice Stadium, to see up close what’s been called one of the most electric entrances in college sports.

  • It’s been a little more than 10 years since the death of the late Helen “Miss Helen” Robinson.

    But the legacy – and the piano she left behind – is still making its mark in the lives of others.

    It was evident on Wednesday afternoon when Ashley Hagins sat at the keyboard of the Yamaha grand piano in the sanctuary of First United Methodist Church.

    Ashley, 17, was preparing for Sunday’s Helen Robinson Memorial Concert there that features performances by her and several local musicians.    

  • Forests have traded their green leaves for a crisp fall wardrobe of gold, red and orange. 

    As you enjoy in this breathtaking display of natural beauty, take a moment to consider this rich land and its historic people. 

    The Catawba Indians have lived in this region for more than 13,000 years. 

    Their traditional foods include turkey, squash, pumpkins, corn, deer, nuts, beans, duck, dove, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, sugar berries and honey. 

  • There’s a tradition at Yosemite National Park in California where a woodpile is set on fire and slowly pushed off a cliff, forming a burning cascade as it falls.

    That image proved to be the inspiration that gave Firefall its name.

    Formed in 1974 in Boulder, Colo., Firefall , with its string of top Country rock hits from two decades, is coming to the University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium stage at 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

  • Although winter doesn’t start until Dec. 21, there are some no-cost and low-cost steps that can be taken to reduce household energy consumption and costs on a daily basis.

    Take advantage of heat from the sun

    – Open curtains on your south-facing windows during daylight hours to allow sunlight to naturally heat your home. Close them at night to reduce the chill you may feel from cold windows.

    Cover drafty windows

  • Crowds of residents packed Main Street in downtown Lancaster on Saturday for the annual Veterans Day Parade. American flags waved in the wind along the street as cars full of those who served in every branch of U.S. Armed Services drove past the crowd. 

    Posted on the cars were the names of the veterans inside, as well as which branch of the military they served in and in which wars they fought.

    There were veterans from World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Iraq, as well as several former prisoners of war. 

  • When 100 of South Carolina’s World War II veterans fly to Washington, D.C., on Nov. 15 to tour the monument placed there in their honor, two Lancaster men will be among them. John Maltese, 86, of Indian Land and L.J. Vincent, 92, of Kershaw were selected for the very first Honor Flight South Carolina. They will visit several landmarks, including the National World War II Memorial in the nation’s capital.  The purpose of the nonprofit Honor Flight South Carolina is to fly veterans like Maltese and Vincent to and from the memorial free of charge.

  • Dr. Renee Bohn never considered the cards, letters and care packages she constantly sent to Sgt. Lavern Patterson in Iraq to be that big a deal. After all, Bohn said Patterson, who worked at Lancaster One Medical as a medical specialist, was part of her extended family. “I was just supporting my girl,” Bohn said. But when Patterson, a Kershaw native with the S.C.