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Today's Features

  • Pleasant Dale Baptist Church, 133 South Potter Road, will dedicate its new family life center during Sunday’s 10:30 a.m. worship service.

    Dr. Dale Roach, director of missions for Moriah Baptist Association, is the guest speaker.

    Roach lauded the 300-plus member Pleasant Dale family for its dedication in completing the 15,188-square-foot facility. The family life center includes a kitchen, work-out rooms, a multi-purpose room that will serve as an interim sanctuary, a gym, a fellowship hall and a youth center. Ground was broken on the project in June 2005.

  • Super Bowl Sunday. The only thing missing is a verb. That, and the Green Bay Packers. Oh well, life goes on.

    I’m in a quandary as who to support during Super Bowl XLIII on Sunday. This year, I may just root for the commercials.

    What I’m going to enjoy most about this Super Bowl is that it means that racing season and the Daytona 500 are only two weeks away.

    It seems one of my high school and college friends doesn’t share my fondness for NASCAR.

  • LIBERTY HILL – On one hand are the Seven Deadly Sins – pride, envy, gluttony, lust, anger, greed and sloth.

    On the other hand, is the tale of a fateful trip that started from a tropic port aboard a tiny ship.

    The two subjects don’t seem to have very much in common, but a group of local youth pastors have found a connection between “Gilligan's Island” and the capital vices.

  • Your pet is a member of the family and when you buy food for them, it’s important to make sure that they are getting the best nutrition possible.

    That means reading the label on the back of the bag, said Max Talbert, of Animal Supply House on S.C. 9 Bypass.

    Talbert knows what he talking about. He is a pet food specialist who’s taken courses on what works best for pets.

  • Retailers continue to pull selected snack food items from grocery store shelves after several food companies issued a recall on products made with peanut butter and peanut paste supplied by the Peanut Corp. of America in connection to a nationwide salmonella outbreak.

  • Maroon and white are the predominant colors at most Carolina Christian Academy basketball games as fans fill the school gym to root for the Cougars.

    But on Friday’s home tilt against Hawthorne Christian Academy Hawks of Chester, school colors took a back seat to purple.

    Why?

    Led by Carolina Christian 12th grader Jessica Hartley, all the proceeds from ticket sales at the door and from a basketball game bake sale were for Relay For Life.

  • Freda Usher isn’t very hard to find most mornings. She’ll be walking along the roadways near her South Potter Road home.

    And Usher does the same thing each afternoon when there is enough daylight left to safely be out.

    This 56-year-old wife and mother of two isn’t walking for her health. Trash bag in hand, Usher is picking up litter.

    It’s a sure thing that Usher will leave things better than she found them.

  • The New Year’s resolution of “out with the old and in with the new” applies to that out-of-view medicine cabinet behind the bathroom mirror that you stare at every morning while brushing your teeth or combing your hair.

    Like a refrigerator, medicine cabinet supplies pile up, often past their expiration dates, said pharmacist Hugh Mobley of Mobley Drugs.

    And just like the refrigerator, a medicine cabinet needs to be cleaned out regularly.

  • In February 2007, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Department of Health and Human Services and the Environmental Protection Agency jointly released new guidelines designed to reduce the diversion of prescription drugs, while also protecting the environment.

    The new federal prescription drug disposal guidelines urge Americans to:

    – Take unused, unneeded or expired prescription drugs out of their original containers and throw them in the trash.

  • Ron Steele believes that New Year’s resolutions to get into shape are a waste of time.

    For the 45-year-old Steele, who has lost more than 100 pounds since 2004 in a life-long struggle against diabetes, the word diet means very little. 

    “I did not go on a diet,” he said. “I made a lifestyle change. To me, you fail because you go an a diet. I made up my mind to make a lifetime commitment. That’s the only way you’re going to succeed.”