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Today's Features

  • In his heyday, the late Cab Calloway’s unique, innovative and ground-breaking, high-energy swing music and jazz brought joy and happiness to millions.

    Now his namesake – Calloway “C.B.” Brooks – is following in his grandfather’s footsteps by teaching the “Hi De Ho” to a new generation. 

  • On Dec. 7, 1941, a young Lancaster man – U.S. Army Sgt. Paul D. Robertson – found himself in the center of America’s entry into the World War II.

    Robertson, an electrician in the 259th Quarter Master Corps of the 7th Bomber Command, was stationed at Hickam Field on the island of Oahu in Hawaii when the war broke out. Hickam is adjacent to Pearl Harbor.

    That day, Robertson received a near-fatal chest wound from flying shrapnel when the Imperial Japanese Air Force started its ugly Sunday morning bombing.

  • It’s no secret that many families here are hurting.

    Right now, Lancaster County has the ninth highest unemployment rate (12.1 percent) in South Carolina.

    Local charities are being hammered by those clamoring for assistance.

    Helping the hurting is what being a Christian is all about, especially at this time of the year, said Brad Strider of the Southern gospel music trio, Mercy’s Well.

  • Bella Swan is a clumsy 17-year-old girl and Edward Cullen is an elegant “vegetarian” vampire. They live in the rainiest town in the United States – Forks, Wash. 

    Their supernatural, best-selling, modern-day romance, written by Stephenie Meyer, has ignited a global cult following that has taken a $70 million bite out of the weekend box office.   

  • Most homeowners add a few features to personalize their yards and make them just a little different. Count Robert and Glenda Mungo among them. 

    So much so that their yard at 1651 Craig Farm Road caught the eye of Penny Bailey. Bailey represents the Green Gardeners on the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs selection committee, which chooses the Yard of the Month.

    The committee chose the Mungos’ yard as Yard of the Month for November.

  • Sometimes, the best recipes go through a lot of hands before making it to the table.

    This version of Pumpkin Mousse is a good example of that.

    Kimberly Gulledge of the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life sent me a Thanksgiving card that included the recipe.

    Suddenly, the light bulb above my head went off.

    It seems that Wal-Mart had donated some leftover pumpkins to the culinary arts class at Lancaster High School.

  • My friend in Texas sent me a link to a puppy cam on Nov. 7.  Click here for the puppy cam.

    Most days since then, I've tuned in from time to time throughout the day to watch the little shiba inus playing with their plush jack-o-laterns, carrots and even a stuffed trout.

    Ocassionally, a man with tattoos on his arms wearing black pants reaches in to handle the puppies, or clean up their messes.

  • Just before the start of every University of South Carolina home football game, Jessica Bradburn gets caught up in moment as the strains of “Also Sprach Zarathustra” (the theme to “2001: A Space Odyssey”) roar over the public address amid 80,000-plus screaming fans.

    She has one of the best vantage points in Williams Brice Stadium, to see up close what’s been called one of the most electric entrances in college sports.

  • It’s been a little more than 10 years since the death of the late Helen “Miss Helen” Robinson.

    But the legacy – and the piano she left behind – is still making its mark in the lives of others.

    It was evident on Wednesday afternoon when Ashley Hagins sat at the keyboard of the Yamaha grand piano in the sanctuary of First United Methodist Church.

    Ashley, 17, was preparing for Sunday’s Helen Robinson Memorial Concert there that features performances by her and several local musicians.    

  • Forests have traded their green leaves for a crisp fall wardrobe of gold, red and orange. 

    As you enjoy in this breathtaking display of natural beauty, take a moment to consider this rich land and its historic people. 

    The Catawba Indians have lived in this region for more than 13,000 years. 

    Their traditional foods include turkey, squash, pumpkins, corn, deer, nuts, beans, duck, dove, blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, sugar berries and honey.