Today's Features

  • Everybody loves it when a “local” makes good, and Lancaster has its share of bragging rights of those who have made their mark.

    You can now add Vickie Bailey Ebbers to the list.

    The Lancaster native is now a nationally-recognized artist who has turned her love of family, friends and even cherished pets into a long list of award-winning paintings.

    Her artwork is now showing in Charlotte as part of the “Carolina’s Got Art,” exhibition at Atherton Mill in the South End Area.

  • When Hazel and Betty Vincent first moved into their home at 112 Survey St. 14 years ago, a manicured lawn was only a pipe dream. 

    Their priority was taking care of Betty’s aging mother. 

    As years passed, Betty lost her mother.

    But Betty found solace for that loss by spending time in her yard. 

    The result is a beautifully landscaped lawn filled with spacious beds providing a variety of blooms and foliage. 

  • The Vivian Major Robinson concert on Oct. 4 will be a first for Lancaster.

    LearnTV will record the recital for playback and also provide the audience with an up-close look at organist Robert P. Glick via a viewing screen during the 2:30 p.m. concert that day at First Presbyterian Church.

    Glick is associate professor of church music and organ at Erskine College and Theological Seminary,

    This is a big change from a normal organ concert.

    For perhaps the first time, you’ll get to see something other than the back of the organist’s head.

  • The Hoppers, America’s “Favorite Family of Gospel Music,” is returning to Lancaster for a 7 p.m. concert today at Second Baptist Church, 1426 Great Falls Highway.

    “This group has been here twice before and is always a fan favorite,” said Dennis Nichols of GlennMark Promotions.

    The group, which started performing as a family ensemble in the late 1950s, includes Claude Hopper, his wife, Connie, their sons Dean and Mike and daughter-in-law Kim Greene Hopper.



































  • In the early 1950s, McIlwain Road was a sleepy dirt road community that wasn’t much more than a short cut from Lancaster to Heath Springs.

    But about half way down it, something was happening, a group of dedicated church members from the area led by the Rev. J.L. Maloney were hard at work.

    When they weren’t working on their area farms or waiting for the mill whistle to blow, they were busy laying bricks to build Oak Ridge ARP Church.

    It might have taken a decade to build the mission church, but it was a labor of love.