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Today's Features

  • On Saturday, Frederick “Rick” Stevens was one of 80-plus graduates who walked across the Charles Bundy Auditorium stage inside the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster to receive a two-year college degree. That’s a far cry from Oct. 9, 1996.

    That’s the day when Stevens – strung out on crack cocaine – walked into Meeting Street Express and tried to rob the place.

    He was arrested the next day after someone recognized him from the store’s video tape.

  • A group of high school students are learning how to become firefighters. But that’s not all they’re learning.

    They’re also learning what it means to be leaders through hands-on community service.

    The members of Explorer Post 8, sponsored by Gooches Crossroads Volunteer Fire Department, recently constructed a handicap accessible ramp at Bonnie Thompson Wright’s home on Memorial Park Road.

    The materials to construct the ramp were donated by Payless Lumber on Brooklyn Avenue, which is within the Gooches fire district.

  • Marinades have an unspoken mystique about them.

    These contrived secret blends miraculously change poultry, seafood, meats and vegetables from bland to bursting with taste.

    Using marinades has been around for hundreds of years, says food writer and cookbook author Peggy Trowbridge Filippone. 

    Marinades date back to pre-Columbian Mexico when cooks wrapped meats in papaya leaves to make them more tender, she writes in her blog on about.com.

    These days, there are many simple flavor-infusing liquids to choose from.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a statement Monday that there is no evidence you can get swine flu virus (H1N1) by eating pork.

    “Swine influenza viruses are not transmitted by food,” the statement said. “You cannot get swine influenza from eating pork or pork products. Eating properly handled and cooked pork and pork products is safe. Cooking pork to an internal temperature of 160 degrees kills the swine flu virus, as it does other bacteria and viruses.”

  • Now, there’s nothing wrong with getting Mom flowers for Mother’s Day, but why not surprise her this year by thinking outside the vase? A little advance planning can go a long way. A heartfelt, homemade card is a great start, but it doesn’t have to end there. And you don’t have to spend loads of money to do it, either. If you know what she loves, you can come up with the perfect Mother’s Day gift that will have her bragging about your thoughtfulness and creativity months from now. A Mother’s Day gift doesn’t have to be expensive.

  • The agriculture science class and the Future Farmers of America at Buford High School have started their annual greenhouse plant sale to benefit those programs.

    The school greenhouse is brimming with plants and flowers of every shape and size.

    Now in its second year, the students have been growing dozens of varieties of plants to sell, including perennials, annuals and vegetables, said Agriculture Science instructor Jeffrey Whisenhunt.

    This is no plant resale, he said. The 32 students have done all the cultivating.

  • Frankie Cunningham learns something new every day. And most of the time, it surrounds her mother, the late Mae “Miss Mae” Wright.

    Wright died June 5, 2002, but the foundation of life she left behind for her two daughters, six grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren is a solid legacy.

  • FORT LAWN – Because of his health, Bill Coble couldn’t pick strawberries at Jordan Farms last spring.

    He’s still unable to pick them, but he left the 3.5 acre strawberry patch with 6 gallons of juicy, ripe just-picked strawberries bright and early Monday. One of the buckets was going to his sister Mable’s house. The other five buckets went home with Bill and his wife, Geraldine Coble.

  • The bluegrass gospel music group, Pinetuckett, above, will be in concert at 6:30 p.m. today at Andrew Jackson State Park amphitheater. The concert is free with park admission. Admission to the park is $2 adults; $1.25 for South Carolina seniors and free for ages 15 and younger.

    Organized in the early 1970s, Pine-tuckett plays a variety of traditional bluegrass and gospel music. The group performs across the Carolinas at festivals, churches and private parties.

  • Twelve years ago, when Derrick Robinson bought the house at 204 York St., he knew the yard had great potential. 

    Like a true “yardener,” Robinson saw past the overgrown, 50-year-old azaleas that nearly covered the front windows. 

    Robinson said he knew that if he could somehow replace them, he could make the York Street yard a showplace. 

    Today, he has succeeded. 

    He and his wife, Lana, have now been awarded Yard of the Month for April by the Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs.