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Today's Features

  • The chances of a high school teacher and four of his students climbing to the top of gospel music charts are pretty unlikely.

    The odds of them remaining there for almost half of a century are even higher, but that’s just what the Inspirations have done.

    Known as one of the most consistent, solid and successful Southern gospel groups, the Inspirations will be in concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Second Baptist Church.

    That just goes to show the Inspirations’ sound is timeless, said Dennis Nichols of GlennMark Promotions.

  • Lauren Rowell knew the opportunity to play softball on an international stage in Eastern Europe last month at the Youth Friendship Games was a once in a lifetime chance.

    But that notion didn’t really sink in for the rising eighth grader at Buford Middle School until the last out was made.

    Rowell, 13, was selected by her United States teammates as its most valuable player in a fast-pitch softball tournament featuring four international softball teams in the 11-to-14 age bracket.

  • Summer squash is a great pretender.

    It’s true that a 1-cup (boiled, drained and lightly salted) is low in saturated fat and very low in cholesterol. It’s a good source of vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and cooper.

    But it doesn’t end there.

    When you include dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamins, B1, B2, B6, folate, potassium and manganese, along with omega-3 fatty acids, squash is a little yellow nutritional powerhouse.

    But at the same time, it’s the biggest liar in the garden patch.

  • For brothers Damon and Devin Mungo, farming has always been a way of life. Between cattle, turkeys jobs and families, the two third-generation farmers take advantage of every hour in the day. The two took over the family farms in 2000 after the death of their father, Dwight.

    Right now, Devin has 220 beef cows and five turkey barns that house 28,000 birds on close to 500 acres. He gets baby turkeys at the age of five weeks old and raises them for 15 more weeks. If that’s not enough, Devin runs a deer processing operation from September through January.

  • This year, families are looking for ways to save money and cut household expenses at the same time. One way to reduce rising food costs is vegetable gardening. Growing your own food and preserving just seems to make sense for many folks trying to spend less while eating healthy. That's the way Larry Ellis sees it. 

    Newcomers to gardening can learn all those tried and true secrets from local growers like Ellis.

  • Earlier this year, 93-year-old Clara Cannucciari became a YouTube darling for a cooking show filmed by her grandson.

    Many of the segments of “Great Depression Cooking with Clara” have generated more than 250,000 views.

    Her recipes for Pasta and Peas, Poorman’s Feast and Egg Drop Soup have been making the rounds.

  • On Aug. 3, White Springs Baptist Church will be 75 years old.

    Since that time at least 40 ministers have gone out from the Erwin Farm-based congregation. And White Springs has been the spiritual home to some of the finest athletes ever to play at Lancaster High School.

    Sometimes these two attributes meshed, as in the case of the Rev. Buford Hayes, a 1954 LHS graduate.

    Hayes, a receiver, is acknowledged by those who can remember as one of the finest football players ever to don the Blue Hurricane uniform, as the team was known at the time.

  • Those in search of local crafts and crops won’t have to look too far Saturday.

    They will be available at the Lancaster Street Market in the green space at the corner of Main and Gay streets.

    A collaboration of the Lancaster Downtown Business Association, the city of Lancaster and See Lancaster, which promotes local tourism, the street markets are held the first Saturday of the month.

    There has been one slight change in the time, said Peggy Little, director of See Lancaster.

  • From what I’m hearing from my friends, the Lancaster County Community Garden is a success.

    The garden, which was spearheaded by the United Way of Lancaster County and Lancaster County Parks and Recreation, was planted on some land near the Springdale Recreation Center.

    Those willing to weed and care for the garden were given plots, to raise food for themselves or donate to local food banks.

  • Thousands of people donate blood in our area each year, and their generous gift has saved countless lives.

    But, the need for blood is constant.

    This summer the American Red Cross is encouraging Americans to “Change Lives Together” by giving blood, said Gina Amato, local executive director.

    “During the busy summer season, the blood supply often suffers,” she said. “With donors on vacation and preoccupied with other summer activities, collections tend to take a dip.”