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Today's Features

  • The TV and radio news reported all day that Hurricane Hugo would hit the South Carolina coast near Charleston, but there was no mention of it coming inland. The order was given for the coastal areas to evacuate.

  • Regina Butz may be the only person in the United States who has wedding and hurricane photos together in the same album.

    Butz, owner of Ace Hardware and Garden Center, and her husband, Tom, eloped to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 16, 1989, for their wedding.

    This wasn’t one of those typical “run off and get married” deals without permission. The couple, in their late 20s, planned their nuptials in great detail and their families knew what was going on.

  • The symbol for Autism Speaks is a blue puzzle piece.

    If you don’t understand the significance of it, just ask Evelyn Springs.

    She’ll tell you about Malik, 7, and how the disease that few understand has affected her grandson.

    Diagnosed with autism at age 2, Malik doesn’t talk much about it.

    That’s because he doesn’t talk.

  • Joe Cahn has the best job in America.

    He is the self-proclaimed commissioner of tailgating, a job he invented in 1996 after selling his business, the New Orleans School of Cooking. He also sold his house and bought a motor home.

    Since then, Cahn has traveled to all 31 NFL stadiums, nine NASCAR tracks and 123 college football stadiums.

    He was in Foxboro, Mass., on Monday night for the Patriots’ home opener against the Buffalo Bills.

    It can be a busy profession, but the recently-married Cahn said it has his wife’s seal of approval.

  • The late Lester Robinson, former managing editor of The Lancaster News, said it better that I ever could in the Dec. 13, 1995, edition.

    In a column about the death of Lavoy Darlington Bauknight two days prior, Robinson wrote, “When the Rev. and Mrs. P.L. Bauknight moved into the First United Methodist Church parsonage in the mid-1930s, little did Lancaster people know then what an impact their son would have here.”

    To be honest, that might be an understatement.

  • With its different colors and textures, sushi is edible art.

    I can’t remember when I first tried this exotic, aesthetically pleasing Japanese delight. I don’t do the eel, salmon or raw fish varieties. I’m happy with some crab, spicy shrimp or vegetarian sushi.

    On a recent Saturday night, I had the joy of eating dinner with Donna and Cecil Weaver of Lancaster. Donna, whose heritage includes Japanese, is from Hawaii, which has its own unique twist on sushi.

  • Looking for something to do with your family Saturday? 

    Bring them to the Springdale Recreation Center for the 2009 Pregnancy Care Center’s Walk for Life.

    Amy Vincent, executive director of the Pregnancy Care Center, said its volunteers have worked hard to make this a family-friendly fundraiser. 

    “We have added activities for the children, including several large inflatables, volleyball, face painting, balloons, refreshments and door prizes,” she said.

    It’s easy to take part in the walk.

  • Local attorney Rick Chandler knows the law. It’s especially clear when it comes to wearing seat belts.

    But there are some things you just don’t forget. He said experiencing death first hand as an 8 year old will do that.

    That day in 1963, Rick was hanging with his dad, the late Richard Chandler, at the family-run body shop when the police radio went off for a wreck call.

    The elder Chandler was out the door in record time to the scene, with his young son riding shotgun.

  • The cross is there. If you look for it hard enough, you’ll find it. It’s in the most unlikely of places.

    It’s nailed to the roof line, hanging beneath a tin shed at the Riverside Rodeo Arena. It’s above two sets of old gym bleachers painted blue and flanked by a portable welding machine.

    There are two old church pews against one side of the shed, but at Carolinas Cowboy Church – a place where the offering is collected in a cowboy hat – the padded benches look out of place.

  • NEWBERRY – These days, Division II Newberry College doesn’t have an official mascot.

    Under pressure from the NCAA in 2008, their Indians nickname was dropped and the spear disappeared from their helmets and was replaced by an “N”

    When football players reported for preseason drills that fall, Lancaster native and Newberry head football coach Todd Knight said they were told the “N” on the side stood for no.