.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • After losing match play to the orange-clad “Flying Scotts” during the 2008 Big Thursday Golf Tournament, John Catalano and Tim Hallman wanted another shot.

    It’s the “wait until next year” attitude at its best, but it wasn’t to be.

    Phillip Scott said his older brother, Evan, is having back problems that knocked them from match-play competition on Nov. 19 that pitted Clemson supporters against the Gamecocks faithful at Lancaster Golf Club.  

  • Ashley Faulkenberry has a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving.

    “Words can’t describe just how thankful I am,” she said. “I’m thankful just to be alive.”

    Seriously injured in a 4-wheeler accident on May 30, this is one holiday that  Ashley, 21, never thought she would see.

    What was billed as a late night of fun and mud-slinging with friends off Spirit Road in the Rich Hill community quickly became a nightmare.

  • If you haven’t found the perfect Thanksgiving turkey by now, don’t fret.                                                                                     

  • For many people, gardening provides an inner solace that helps maintain balance in an otherwise hectic world. It provides an escape into nature where yards take on the unique personality of the gardener.

    It’s those personal touches in Jean Wilson’s yard at 2239 Sunshine Road that caught the eye of Joyce Morin of the Lancaster Garden Club. The club named Wilson’s yard the November Yard of the Month.

  • Roaming the streets at The Carolina Renaissance Festival has become old hat for 30-year-old Troy Dunbar. But in true renaissance fashion, that hat has changed into a turban.

    After portraying a wandering poet at the festival for three years, Dunbar is now Arabian sultan Azeen Al-Mullah (“defender of money”) at the 16th- century European-style arts and entertainment festival.     

    And Dunbar, choral director at Lancaster High School, is easy to spot.

  • If you see Garen Hicks around town, he might not have much to say.

    The black bracelet he wears says what words can’t.

    He wears it as a memorial to his friend and fellow 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade member U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Carlo Robinson.

    A Hope, Ark., native, the 33-year-old Robinson was killed Jan. 17, 2009, when a roadside bomb detonated near his vehicle in Kabul when his patrol was attacked.

    Robinson was one of 17 of that unit’s soldiers killed during a 15-month deployment in Afghanistan.

  • In a 38-year professional music career, Ricky Skaggs has pretty much seen it all. Now he’s seen just a little more.

    Arm in arm with his daughter, Molly, and his son, Luke, the Skaggs were afforded a special treat Saturday, courtesy of L&C Railway and See Lancaster.

    The Skaggs family, and their respective bands, Kentucky Thunder and Songs of Water, enjoyed a L&C luxury train ride excursion to the Catawba River and back before performing at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster on Saturday night.

  • Nobody wants to get old before their time.

    But this week, I’m sort of wishing I was born in 1950 instead of 1960.

    Why? It’s simple.

    If I was about 10 years older, it would mean that I would’ve gotten to see both Tracy Mc-Griff and Jimmie “Buck” Sistare grace the gridiron.

  • The late Hobert Skaggs always had a hidden reason behind everything he did.

    The mandolin that 5-year-old Ricky Skaggs found in his bed one Saturday morning some 50 years ago, and the G, C and D chords that Hobert taught his son weren’t just learning tools and a musical instrument.

    It was Hobert’s connection to his Eastern Kentucky childhood that was lost when his brother was killed in World War II.

  • Andrew Jackson State Park will have a different aura Saturday night when stories are woven around burning campfires and shadows cast by flickering candles.

    However, these won’t be ghost stories or tall tales.

    It’s the annual Life in the Waxhaws lantern tour at the park which bears the name of a president. 

    The lantern tour offers a historical look at 18th century life in the Waxhaws during the 1780s when Jackson was a lad.