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Today's Features

  • With their distinctive four-part harmonies and combination of country and bluegrass-tinged tunes, Little Big Town is sure to lure a few more fans into their fold on Saturday.

    That’s when the up-and-coming country group performs as part of See Lancaster’s Performing Arts Series at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster’s Bundy Auditorium. The four-time Grammy Award-nominated band is the third act to be featured in the 2009-10 series.

  • There’s only one candle on Lallage Jones’ birthday cake. Since Lallage is celebrating her 101st birthday today, she’s entitled to as many or as few candles as she wants.

    And Lallage, a retired educator and “preacher’s wife,” hasn’t lost her sense of humor about reaching the milestone.

    Born Oct. 11, 1908, she had one early birthday celebration with family and friends during this week’s Golden Age Group luncheon at First United Methodist Church.

  • These days, consumers are trying to stretch every dollar as far as possible.

    But if you have thoughts of partially reusing in the kitchen what you scoop from a Halloween jack-o’-lantern this year, you may be disappointed by the results.

    Why?

    Pumpkins intended for carving don’t taste good; they are only meant as  decorations for ghosts and goblins.

  • The stack of July 22, 2009, issues of The Lancaster News in the newspaper morgue is getting shorter.

    Just about once a week now, the voice on the other end of the phone makes the same request.

    “I cut out the recipe for that Butter Pecan Pound Cake that has the icing mixed into the batter, but I don’t know what I did with it. Can you tell me how to get another copy of it? That thing is perfect with a cup of coffee.”

    One of my neighbors, Ken McManus, has a similar opinion of the cake.

  • Dr. John Griffin, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of South Carolina, has always been fascinated by the life (and death) of Abraham Lincoln.

    But through the years, Lincoln’s life has grown to such heroic and epic proportions that it’s hard to separate fact from fiction.

    Now Griffin has put together another biography on the 16th president entitled “Mr. Lincoln and His War.”

    Griffin will make a 30-minute slide presentation and sign copies of his latest book at 7 p.m. Oct. 12 at the Lancaster County Library. 

  • Sausage is almost like barbecue. Each region (and sometimes, country) has its own kind that uses ingredients and seasonings common to that specific area.

    It’s sort of like mustard base, vinegar base, ketchup base and white base barbecue sauces. Sausage is what it is, depending on where you live.

    In the South, sausage is usually a mixture of ground pork, pork fat, sage and peppers and other spices that’s made into patties and fried.

  • Janie McManus loves historical fiction.

    For the seventh grade social studies teacher at South Middle School, it’s a way to make the textbook come alive.

    Right now, she is reading “Breadwinner” by Deborah Ellis, to her classes, which is about the Taliban in Afghanistan.

    “Will it be on that big test at the end of the year? Probably not,” she said.

    “But it’s timely and they need to know this stuff.

  • Pure Prairie League still throws T-shirts in the seats before taking the stage.

    The play list for each concert is still taped to the floor beneath each microphone. Some things never change.

    Talk about old school, they still tune guitars in between songs, when needed.

  • Everybody loves it when a “local” makes good, and Lancaster has its share of bragging rights of those who have made their mark.

    You can now add Vickie Bailey Ebbers to the list.

    The Lancaster native is now a nationally-recognized artist who has turned her love of family, friends and even cherished pets into a long list of award-winning paintings.

    Her artwork is now showing in Charlotte as part of the “Carolina’s Got Art,” exhibition at Atherton Mill in the South End Area.

  • When Hazel and Betty Vincent first moved into their home at 112 Survey St. 14 years ago, a manicured lawn was only a pipe dream. 

    Their priority was taking care of Betty’s aging mother. 

    As years passed, Betty lost her mother.

    But Betty found solace for that loss by spending time in her yard. 

    The result is a beautifully landscaped lawn filled with spacious beds providing a variety of blooms and foliage.