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Today's Features

  • Cows and other livestock have become more protective of their new offspring while cattlemen say they’ve seen foot tracks similar to that of a canine. But they don’t believe stray dogs are to blame.

    They say the answer lies in the coyotes, which are being talked about more and more as local sightings increase.

    A number of Lancaster County residents have reported spotting coyotes in the area recently. However, wildlife officials say their presence is nothing new and that people should expect to continue seeing them.

  • Four Lancaster families will roll out a yuletide carpet Sunday for the Lancaster Garden Club’s 23rd annual Christmas Tour of Homes. Here is a brief glimpse at what you can see.

    Ballard focuses on comfort

    When it comes to opening the doors of his home Sunday, Realtor Casey Ballard said hopes the decorations at Meadow Drive will pass muster.

    “The time has really slipped up on us and it’s here,” Ballard said. “I guess I’m about as ready as I’ll ever be.”

  • It’s hard for LaDonna Mann to remember what life was like before she learned about the plight of thousands of orphans in the African nation of Kenya.

    As curator of the JAARS Museum of the Alphabet in Waxhaw, Mann spends her days informing the public about the varied histories of alphabets and languages. But she experienced another language firsthand several years ago while living with her late husband Bill in Nairobi, the capital of Kenya.

  • ‘Nuncrackers’ will crack you up

    Looking for some seasonal entertainment that will give you a good laugh?

    Then head into Fort Mill this week to see “Nuncrackers,” produced and directed by Elaine Roberts of Sun City Carolina Lakes.

    The musical comedy, which opened Dec. 3, is playing at the Fort Mill Community Playhouse theater, 615 Banks St., Fort Mill.

    Remaining show times are 7:30 p.m. Dec. 11, 12, 18 and 19 and 3 p.m. Dec. 13.

  • In 1942, Winston Churchill said that tea was more important than ammunition in strengthening the moral of British troops.

    Tea didn’t hurt Uncle Sam’s war efforts, either, said Betty Broome.

    Broome, who was a youngster during World War II, still recalls how women in Van Wyck would hold afternoon teas to raise money.

  • When the Rev. Bill Knight looks out across the 35-acre site where the world’s largest cotton mill once stood, he doesn’t see rusting fences, abandoned railroad tracks, tall grass and small bits of handmade bricks left behind when a texile plant was demolished.

    Knight sees a thriving mill where thousands of lint-heads worked around the clock after walking to work or catching a ride there on the Wilson bus line.

    Instead of burned-out decaying homes, he recalls a vibrant tight-knit mill village. He said some of its 3,000-plus residents were his role models.

  • When it comes to saving money, every little bit helps and there is a little good news for consumers this Thanksgiving.

    You may have noticed it while standing in the grocery checkout line.

    According to a report released by the American Farm Bureau Federation on Nov. 12,  the cost of preparing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner – the turkey, stuffing cranberries, pumpkin pie and all the basic trimmings – won’t be as high this year. 

  • After losing match play to the orange-clad “Flying Scotts” during the 2008 Big Thursday Golf Tournament, John Catalano and Tim Hallman wanted another shot.

    It’s the “wait until next year” attitude at its best, but it wasn’t to be.

    Phillip Scott said his older brother, Evan, is having back problems that knocked them from match-play competition on Nov. 19 that pitted Clemson supporters against the Gamecocks faithful at Lancaster Golf Club.  

  • Ashley Faulkenberry has a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving.

    “Words can’t describe just how thankful I am,” she said. “I’m thankful just to be alive.”

    Seriously injured in a 4-wheeler accident on May 30, this is one holiday that  Ashley, 21, never thought she would see.

    What was billed as a late night of fun and mud-slinging with friends off Spirit Road in the Rich Hill community quickly became a nightmare.

  • If you haven’t found the perfect Thanksgiving turkey by now, don’t fret.