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Today's Features

  • In 1942, Winston Churchill said that tea was more important than ammunition in strengthening the moral of British troops.

    Tea didn’t hurt Uncle Sam’s war efforts, either, said Betty Broome.

    Broome, who was a youngster during World War II, still recalls how women in Van Wyck would hold afternoon teas to raise money.

  • When the Rev. Bill Knight looks out across the 35-acre site where the world’s largest cotton mill once stood, he doesn’t see rusting fences, abandoned railroad tracks, tall grass and small bits of handmade bricks left behind when a texile plant was demolished.

    Knight sees a thriving mill where thousands of lint-heads worked around the clock after walking to work or catching a ride there on the Wilson bus line.

    Instead of burned-out decaying homes, he recalls a vibrant tight-knit mill village. He said some of its 3,000-plus residents were his role models.

  • When it comes to saving money, every little bit helps and there is a little good news for consumers this Thanksgiving.

    You may have noticed it while standing in the grocery checkout line.

    According to a report released by the American Farm Bureau Federation on Nov. 12,  the cost of preparing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner – the turkey, stuffing cranberries, pumpkin pie and all the basic trimmings – won’t be as high this year. 

  • After losing match play to the orange-clad “Flying Scotts” during the 2008 Big Thursday Golf Tournament, John Catalano and Tim Hallman wanted another shot.

    It’s the “wait until next year” attitude at its best, but it wasn’t to be.

    Phillip Scott said his older brother, Evan, is having back problems that knocked them from match-play competition on Nov. 19 that pitted Clemson supporters against the Gamecocks faithful at Lancaster Golf Club.  

  • Ashley Faulkenberry has a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving.

    “Words can’t describe just how thankful I am,” she said. “I’m thankful just to be alive.”

    Seriously injured in a 4-wheeler accident on May 30, this is one holiday that  Ashley, 21, never thought she would see.

    What was billed as a late night of fun and mud-slinging with friends off Spirit Road in the Rich Hill community quickly became a nightmare.

  • If you haven’t found the perfect Thanksgiving turkey by now, don’t fret.                                                                                     

  • For many people, gardening provides an inner solace that helps maintain balance in an otherwise hectic world. It provides an escape into nature where yards take on the unique personality of the gardener.

    It’s those personal touches in Jean Wilson’s yard at 2239 Sunshine Road that caught the eye of Joyce Morin of the Lancaster Garden Club. The club named Wilson’s yard the November Yard of the Month.

  • Roaming the streets at The Carolina Renaissance Festival has become old hat for 30-year-old Troy Dunbar. But in true renaissance fashion, that hat has changed into a turban.

    After portraying a wandering poet at the festival for three years, Dunbar is now Arabian sultan Azeen Al-Mullah (“defender of money”) at the 16th- century European-style arts and entertainment festival.     

    And Dunbar, choral director at Lancaster High School, is easy to spot.

  • If you see Garen Hicks around town, he might not have much to say.

    The black bracelet he wears says what words can’t.

    He wears it as a memorial to his friend and fellow 1st Maneuver Enhancement Brigade member U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Carlo Robinson.

    A Hope, Ark., native, the 33-year-old Robinson was killed Jan. 17, 2009, when a roadside bomb detonated near his vehicle in Kabul when his patrol was attacked.

    Robinson was one of 17 of that unit’s soldiers killed during a 15-month deployment in Afghanistan.

  • In a 38-year professional music career, Ricky Skaggs has pretty much seen it all. Now he’s seen just a little more.

    Arm in arm with his daughter, Molly, and his son, Luke, the Skaggs were afforded a special treat Saturday, courtesy of L&C Railway and See Lancaster.

    The Skaggs family, and their respective bands, Kentucky Thunder and Songs of Water, enjoyed a L&C luxury train ride excursion to the Catawba River and back before performing at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster on Saturday night.