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Today's Features

  • INDIAN LAND – Frances Flock has no idea whether her favorite sweater vest is subliminal, symbolic or cryptic.

    But there is a story behind the rhesus monkeys embroidered on it.

    That monkey vest pays tribute to Jocko Flocko, NASCAR’s simian race driver extraordinaire and the co-pilot who made her husband, the late Tim Flock, a household hit in the early 1950s.

    “All the kids wanted to see the monkey,” she said.

  • Sunday is National Cherry Pie Day.                                  
    Now, if you didn’t know that, don’t feel bad. Saturday is National Chocolate Mint Day, and I didn’t know about that one, either.
    No one is sure how Feb. 20 got to be National Cherry Pie Day.

  • Jody Miles is back. And so is that sense of humor and smile God gave her.
    Miles, 57, grins every time she reads Jeremiah 29:11 and she is grinning more each day as she recovers from a liver transplant.
    That verse of Scripture has been a big comfort for the co-founder of Christian Services in the last two years.
    Miles has all but forgotten the numerous setbacks from esophageal surgery and a cat bite in July that punted her from the top of the liver transplant list at the Medical University of South Carolina.

  • Wildfire season in South Carolina normally starts in late winter and early spring.
    Given the weather conditions, officials here are keeping a close eye on things, especially after a 15-acre pasture off Pardue Road burned Wednesday about 1 p.m.
    Firefighters from Shiloh-Zion and Camp Creek volunteer fire departments, Lancaster County Fire Service and a S.C. Forestry Commission plow worked for about two hours to bring the blaze under control.

  • Having a police cruiser pull into the driveway at 3 a.m. and hearing the car door slam shut is unexpected, to say the least.

    But not for 78-year-old Sarah Kirkland. She’s grown used to it.

    As soon as “Ms. Sarah” heard the officer knock on the door of her Cedar Run Road home in the Pleasant Hill community, the kitchen lights were on and the bath water was running.

    That’s because there was a special love in her house that could meet a special need.

  • For many of us, balancing family, family life and career responsibilities, can be a high wire act.
    Sometimes, I wonder how we get everything done that has to be.
    Take Tuesday, for example. I was at Shiloh Unity ARP Church at 6 p.m. for an upcoming work-related article, and my wife, Jo, had to leave for her job at Springs Memorial Hospital about that same time.
    Before the night was up, our daughter, Betty Jo, had a basketball game.

  • Your hard-working vehicle needs attention during cold weather, too. Below-freezing temperatures can especially take a toil on rubber and plastic parts, causing them to fail and break. Here are some basic maintenance tips to keep your car running in tip-top shape after last week’s snowstorm:

  • Moisture problems occur inside a home whenever there is an imbalance between the amount entering and exiting it and the structure’s capacity to store that moisture.
    Moisture is generated through cooking, bathing, watering indoor plants, using unvented space heaters and washing clothes.
    If this happens on a cold window pane, you will see the water run down and collect on the window sill, where it may damage the paint or rot the wood trim.
    The water may even freeze, producing frost on the inside surface of the window.

  • Moisture problems occur inside a home whenever there is an imbalance between the amount entering and exiting it and the structure’s capacity to store that moisture.
    Moisture is generated through cooking, bathing, watering indoor plants, using unvented space heaters and washing clothes.
    If this happens on a cold window pane, you will see the water run down and collect on the window sill, where it may damage the paint or rot the wood trim.
    The water may even freeze, producing frost on the inside surface of the window.

  • At one time, soup was just considered part of a meal.

    These days, thanks to busy lifestyles and ultra-tight budgets, one-pot cooking has become popular and economical.

    While canned soup requires little effort to prepare, it doesn’t compare to the homemade variety.

    A few flavor-filled ingredients, when combined with chicken or beef stock and the right amount of seasoning, will create a tasty pot of the good stuff.

    It requires a little more work, but making soup is one case where the result is worth the effort.