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Today's Features

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster's Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and publicty chairman for DAV Chapter ???, said Lancaster's war dead gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.

    And its been that way since April 6, 1917 when the United States entered World War I. Stroud said since in the last 93 years, more than 620,000 of America's sons and daughters have made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. 

  • Many Americans view Memorial Day as the holiday that ushers in summer.

    Others see it as the end of the school year and a time of pomp and circumstance that surrounds high school graduation.

    For some, it is a holiday to rightfully honor the forgotten men and women who served and died to protect America’s freedom.

    But at least one woman – Sally Deese – sees Memorial Day weekend as a chance to say thank you to a group that’s near and dear to her, and that’s what she does through the Golden Age of Merit dinner.

  • Thrill, fill and spill.

    No, those words aren’t meant to describe the twists and turns of an amusement park ride or action adventure show.

    It’s a phrase that’s become a popular way to describe grouping together various plants in one container to create an instant wow factor.

  • The roots of America as a nation can be traced to May 29, 1780, and what happened in a clearing off Rocky River Road in eastern Lancaster County.

    There is little doubt that what happened 230 years ago – when British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton’s Green Dragoons clashed with American Col. Abraham Buford’s retreating Virginia Regiment – affected the outcome of the American Revolution, said Wayne Roberts, an archaeologist for the S.C. Department of Transportation.

  • If you were in downtown Lancaster on Feb. 6, 1999, you probably haven’t forgotten an event significant to local history.

    That day, the skeleton of a once-stately Lancaster home began a slow ride from North White Street to its new home on Craig Farm Road.

    Just over a year later, on May 21, 2000, the beautifully restored and enhanced home was dedicated by former Gov. Jim Hodges as Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm.

    Time does fly.

  • At 3 p.m., May 23, Carolina Brass will return to the lawns of Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm, for a special anniversary concert, “Carolina Brass on Broadway.”

    The group performed at the Kilburnie dedication 10 years ago.

  • As Sammie Lathan dives into a plate loaded down with grits, scrambled eggs, salty strips of bacon and white toast slathered in grape jelly, it’s easy to see why JoMars Family Restaurant has such a devoted clientele.

    Lathan, a Lancaster resident, stops by the restaurant for some of his home-cooked favorites at least once a week.

    Today, Lathan pulled up a seat near the famed “Fatback Hotbar” along with his friend, Charles Jones.

  • Would you like to nominate a deserving mother for South Carolina Mother of the Year?

    The S.C. Mother of the Year Search Committee. a non-profit organization that promotes spiritual and moral values in families, is now accepting nominations for S.C. Mother of the Year for 2011.

  • The “singer’s singer” whose voice has touched millions of lives around the world is coming to Lancaster.

    Award winning gospel singer Cynthia Clawson will perform at 11 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church.

    “I think being considered a ‘singer’s singer’ means ‘someone can sing for me and I won’t be critical,’” said Clawson, laughing. “As singers, we listen so critically to how others do it. I think it means I can just relax and enjoy when she sings, or at least I hope that’s what it means.”

  • Seven minutes.

    That’s how long it took Wednesday night for the members of First Presbyterian Church to light 175 candles to celebrate its 175th anniversary.

    But those previous 175 years wouldn’t be the issue for the church’s original founders, said Dr. Shane Owens, First Presbyterian pastor.

    Nor would those 175 points of light that illuminated its church sanctuary, along with the 10 stained glass windows Wednesday night.