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Today's Features

  • Almost three years ago, stones were placed in each Sunday school classroom at St. Luke United Methodist Church.

    Its members were asked to write prayer requests on each one and how they could each be used to make a dream of a “new” sanctuary into a reality.

    When the St. Luke sanctuary renovations were started in October 2009, those stones were literally poured into the foundation.

    Consecrated on Sunday, the sanctuary is indeed a house of worship built on the prayers of its people, said the Rev. Kyle Randle.

  • There’s a Relay For Life sign leaning on the desk just outside Room 105 at Buford Elementary School.

    When the new school first opened, Room 105 was a teacher’s lounge. Trust me, I know, having spent my share of time in it assisting teachers while fulfilling the volunteer hours requirement for Discovery School.

    But now, the Bunn coffee maker, refrigerator and miscellaneous teacher supplies are gone.

  • If you’re looking for a few bargains, a great place and time to find them is  early Saturday at the Family Promise yard sale.

    It begins at 6 a.m. in the old Harris Teeter parking lot at 415 W. Meeting St., across from Crawford Funeral Home. 

    Family Promise volunteer Hugh Mobley said proceeds from the yard sale will go directly to help local homeless families get back on their feet. 

  • A youth group from The Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist Church will volunteer in July at Give Kids The World Village in July, a summer camp for kids with terminal illnesses in Kissimmee, Fla. 

    Located on 70 acres, it has more than 140 villas and an enchanted castle,  along with other amenities that are available to those with special needs who stay there.

    Give Kids The World gets the names of the kids from other organizations and flies them in for a week.

  • Each year, the Relay For Life puts a face on cancer victims, survivors and their caregivers for everyone to see.

    For Hampton “Hamp” Sherrin, 21, cancer now has a face, but he doesn’t know it belongs to. And Sherrin won’t know who it belongs to until next spring.

    But it is a face he wants to see.

    The Buford High School graduate and senior at Presbyterian College has changed, and hopefully, saved someone’s life.

  • The Lancaster County Council of the Arts and EMK Music will present a Friends Concert on Sunday afternoon.

    The classical concert will feature local and regional musicians, including flutist Erin Moon-Kelly, pianist Margaret Walsh-Monroe and soprano Michelle Evans Jarell.

    The concert will begin at 3 p.m at the Springs House, 201 W. Gay St., Lancaster.

    Admission is free, but the Arts Council will take donations for future performing arts programs.

  •  By GREGORY A. SUMMERS

  • Since forming in 1999, the music ministry of Legacy Five has been paved with success.

    There have been numerous hit songs, appearances on Gaither and Friends Homecoming videos, on “In Touch” with Dr. Charles Stanley, TNN, TBN, Sky Angel, INSP, GMT and The Odyssey Network, music awards and a strong fan base.

    But that road to success has been bumpy, too, said Legacy Five’s Scott Fowler.

    The Southern gospel quartet will perform at 7 p.m. today  at Second Baptist Church as part of the 2010 GlennMark Concert Series.

  • Each year, the Relay For Life puts a face to cancer victims, survivors and their caregivers for everyone to see.

    For Hampton Sherrin, 21, cancer now has a face, but he doesn’t know it belongs to. And Sherrin won’t know who it belongs to until next spring.

    But it is a face he wants to see.

    The Buford High School graduate and senior at Presbyterian College has changed, and hopefully, saved someone’s life.

  • The numbers are staggering.

    Every 25 seconds, someone in America is diagnosed with diabetes.

    Right now, there are 23.6 million Americans living with diabetes. That’s almost 8 percent of the United States population.

    There are nearly six million more people living with diabetes who don’t know it. That includes an estimated 415,000 South Carolinians, said Lori Moseley, program manager of the Diabetes Education Clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.