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Today's Features

  • For children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it’s important for them to control the disease, not let it control them.

    That’s what the staff of the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster will stress at Camp CLAD (Children Learning About Diabetes).

    The free camp is 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17 at the Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center and the Gregory Health and Wellness Center at USCL.

  • COLUMBIA – The S.C. Emergency Management Division’s 2010 South Carolina Hurricane Guide is now available in English and Spanish for the entire six-month hurricane season at www.scemd.org.

    The guide is the only officially recognized hurricane preparedness guide for South Carolina and is valid for the 2010 hurricane season, which lasts from June 1 to Nov. 30.

  • Every time Hal Crenshaw looks across the somewhat overgrown field in the middle of an 850-acre tract of private property just off Stacks Road in the Tabernacle community, he knows there is a better way.

    Appearances can be deceiving. That field, with its mixture of red clover, chicory, switchgrass and other prairie grasses is part of finding that better way. It’s not a barren field; it’s a field of dreams.

    An avid outdoorsman, Crenshaw recalls some 35 years ago when this field and many like it were teeming with wildlife.

  • The waters of the Atlantic basin are already warmer than normal and weather forecasters are predicting record warm waters before the year is up.

    That signals an active hurricane season, according The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center.

    The NOAA issued its 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook on May 27.

    The forecast calls for an 85 percent chance of an above-normal hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.

  • There’s a rocking chair next to the fireplace in Bob and Fran Bundy’s home.

    But this isn’t just any cane-bottomed antique.

    It belonged to Fran’s great- great-grandfather, David M. Johnston. Above the fireplace hangs a framed, hand-stitched South Carolina state flag that was a gift from a group of Barnwell students, given to David’s grandson and Fran’s grandfather, Horace Johnston Crouch.

    Every one of the Bundy’s antiques are personal mementos that weave a family story.

  • One cup of strawberries has only 55 calories. They are a great source of vitamin C, with eight strawberries providing 140 percent of the recommended daily intake for kids.

    However, much of that vitamin C  content can be destroyed when strawberries are prepared for eating through coming in contact with extreme heat or soaking in water too long. They are best eaten as soon as possible.

    Strawberries have anti-inflammatory properties and are used by some to treat anemia, joint disease, hormone imbalances and to strengthen the circulatory system.

  • FORT LAWN – Harold Osborne’s Sunday school class at Second Baptist Church got quite a treat on Sunday morning to go with their coffee.

    They were treated to a Strawberry Punch Bowl Cake, courtesy of Marsha Deerman.

    “I’m gonna find out where she’s going to church,” said a laughing David Jordan, the owner of Jordan’s Farms. “That’s better than the deacons visiting.” 

  • Interested?

    WHAT: Camp Clad, (Children Learning About Diabetes) hosted by the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. The camp is designed to create a fun and safe environment for children, ages 6 to 12, and teens ages 13 to 17 with type 1 diabetes. 

    WHERE: Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center at USCL, 509 Hubbard Drive

    WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17

    HOW MUCH:

    INFORMATION: (803) 313-7450

    Gregory A. Summers

    gsummers@thelancasternews.com

  • One must have a special eye to visualize the possibilities of a house and yard that have been left unattended for a period of time. 

    When Tony and Nancy Topf first spotted the house at 910 Forest Drive in Lancaster, they were able to see beyond the dense trees and a lawn covered in moss instead of grass. 

    They could even see potential that a house built in the 1950’s would have, once it was painted, a neutral color to blend into the natural surroundings.

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to the 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster’s Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and legislative chairman for the S.C. Disabled American Veterans and S.C. American Legion,  didn’t mince words Sunday during the county’s 19th annual Memorial Day program.

    Stroud said too many times politicians and those drawing government salaries tend to forget it’s the war dead who gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.