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Today's Features

  • FORT LAWN – Harold Osborne’s Sunday school class at Second Baptist Church got quite a treat on Sunday morning to go with their coffee.

    They were treated to a Strawberry Punch Bowl Cake, courtesy of Marsha Deerman.

    “I’m gonna find out where she’s going to church,” said a laughing David Jordan, the owner of Jordan’s Farms. “That’s better than the deacons visiting.” 

  • Interested?

    WHAT: Camp Clad, (Children Learning About Diabetes) hosted by the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster. The camp is designed to create a fun and safe environment for children, ages 6 to 12, and teens ages 13 to 17 with type 1 diabetes. 

    WHERE: Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center at USCL, 509 Hubbard Drive

    WHEN: 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17

    HOW MUCH:

    INFORMATION: (803) 313-7450

    Gregory A. Summers

    gsummers@thelancasternews.com

  • One must have a special eye to visualize the possibilities of a house and yard that have been left unattended for a period of time. 

    When Tony and Nancy Topf first spotted the house at 910 Forest Drive in Lancaster, they were able to see beyond the dense trees and a lawn covered in moss instead of grass. 

    They could even see potential that a house built in the 1950’s would have, once it was painted, a neutral color to blend into the natural surroundings.

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to the 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster’s Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and legislative chairman for the S.C. Disabled American Veterans and S.C. American Legion,  didn’t mince words Sunday during the county’s 19th annual Memorial Day program.

    Stroud said too many times politicians and those drawing government salaries tend to forget it’s the war dead who gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.

  • A debt of gratitude is owed to 198 soldiers whose names are etched in bronze on the war memorial at Lancaster's Memorial Park, said Ernest Stroud.

    Stroud, a Korean Conflict veteran and publicty chairman for DAV Chapter ???, said Lancaster's war dead gave their all to protect a way of life that we now enjoy.

    And its been that way since April 6, 1917 when the United States entered World War I. Stroud said since in the last 93 years, more than 620,000 of America's sons and daughters have made the ultimate sacrifice for freedom. 

  • Many Americans view Memorial Day as the holiday that ushers in summer.

    Others see it as the end of the school year and a time of pomp and circumstance that surrounds high school graduation.

    For some, it is a holiday to rightfully honor the forgotten men and women who served and died to protect America’s freedom.

    But at least one woman – Sally Deese – sees Memorial Day weekend as a chance to say thank you to a group that’s near and dear to her, and that’s what she does through the Golden Age of Merit dinner.

  • Thrill, fill and spill.

    No, those words aren’t meant to describe the twists and turns of an amusement park ride or action adventure show.

    It’s a phrase that’s become a popular way to describe grouping together various plants in one container to create an instant wow factor.

  • The roots of America as a nation can be traced to May 29, 1780, and what happened in a clearing off Rocky River Road in eastern Lancaster County.

    There is little doubt that what happened 230 years ago – when British Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton’s Green Dragoons clashed with American Col. Abraham Buford’s retreating Virginia Regiment – affected the outcome of the American Revolution, said Wayne Roberts, an archaeologist for the S.C. Department of Transportation.

  • If you were in downtown Lancaster on Feb. 6, 1999, you probably haven’t forgotten an event significant to local history.

    That day, the skeleton of a once-stately Lancaster home began a slow ride from North White Street to its new home on Craig Farm Road.

    Just over a year later, on May 21, 2000, the beautifully restored and enhanced home was dedicated by former Gov. Jim Hodges as Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm.

    Time does fly.

  • At 3 p.m., May 23, Carolina Brass will return to the lawns of Kilburnie, the Inn at Craig Farm, for a special anniversary concert, “Carolina Brass on Broadway.”

    The group performed at the Kilburnie dedication 10 years ago.