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Today's Features

  • Sandra Hinson got a little glimpse of heaven this week.

    She saw it in the pallet of shingles in her Flat Creek Road yard, boxes of roofing nails, new windows and a fresh coat of paint.

    Most don’t see the teenagers and adult volunteers who spent most of this week putting a new roof on Hinson’s small home as angels.

    But those who don’t should see them from Hinson’s perspective.

    That perspective comes from a roof that leaks so bad that water pools inside light fixtures.

  • To See Lancaster SC Director Peggy Little, little things mean a lot.

    That’s one thing she has learned when it comes to luring top-notch acts here as part of the See Lancaster SC Performing Arts Series.

    Little and 11 other members of the See Lancaster SC board who come up with the Performing Arts Series each year have also become adept at putting together jigsaw puzzles.

  • In the next few days, hundreds of children in Lancaster County will be learning Bible verses, singing songs, making crafts and gulping all the Kool-Aid and sandwich cremes they can hold.

    A sure sign of summer vacation is Vacation Bible School.

    Many area churches have been, and will be, teaching about Christianity through themes such as “Saddle Ridge Ranch” and “Step Up and Go Green for Jesus” in the upcoming weeks.

  • Early Thursday, James Stogner pulled the back of his Ford pickup between two posts beneath the pavilion at the Lancaster County Farmers’ Market on Pageland Highway.

    He dropped the tailgate, reached inside and slid a square upside-down kitchen table out of the truck bed and turned it over onto to the cement.

    In no time at all, Stogner had the tabletop covered in heads of fresh cabbage, bright green cucumbers, squash and peppers.

  • Click here to download the gift for your father. 

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  • Most drivers passing by the Boy Scout hut in Elgin just off Kershaw-Camden Highway on Monday evening didn’t give the members of Boy Scout Troop 180 a second glance.

    Eleven Boy Scouts and three leaders with sweat stains dripping down the backs of their crisp, clean dress uniforms, stood at attention beneath a flag pole looking at the faded red, white and blue flag that hung over their heads.

  • The official start of summer is just a few days away.

    But there’s nothing wrong with getting started 12 days earlier by grabbing a tall glass of iced tea and sitting beneath a shade tree to enjoy it.

    This is the perfect time to do it, too. Thursday, June 10, is National Iced Tea Day.

    Americans have enjoyed a love affair with iced tea for more than 100 years.

    The beginnings of iced tea as America’s drink of choice are steeped in legend.

  • The Lancaster County office of the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service will hold a pond management workshop from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    Workshop topics include pond stocking, fish health, population balance, water chemistry, pond fertilization, aquatic weed identification and aquatic weed control techniques and herbicide alternatives, along with an open discussion to cover other questions. 

  • For children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it’s important for them to control the disease, not let it control them.

    That’s what the staff of the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster will stress at Camp CLAD (Children Learning About Diabetes).

    The free camp is 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17 at the Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center and the Gregory Health and Wellness Center at USCL.

  • COLUMBIA – The S.C. Emergency Management Division’s 2010 South Carolina Hurricane Guide is now available in English and Spanish for the entire six-month hurricane season at www.scemd.org.

    The guide is the only officially recognized hurricane preparedness guide for South Carolina and is valid for the 2010 hurricane season, which lasts from June 1 to Nov. 30.