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Today's Features

  • Most drivers passing by the Boy Scout hut in Elgin just off Kershaw-Camden Highway on Monday evening didn’t give the members of Boy Scout Troop 180 a second glance.

    Eleven Boy Scouts and three leaders with sweat stains dripping down the backs of their crisp, clean dress uniforms, stood at attention beneath a flag pole looking at the faded red, white and blue flag that hung over their heads.

  • The official start of summer is just a few days away.

    But there’s nothing wrong with getting started 12 days earlier by grabbing a tall glass of iced tea and sitting beneath a shade tree to enjoy it.

    This is the perfect time to do it, too. Thursday, June 10, is National Iced Tea Day.

    Americans have enjoyed a love affair with iced tea for more than 100 years.

    The beginnings of iced tea as America’s drink of choice are steeped in legend.

  • The Lancaster County office of the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service will hold a pond management workshop from 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in the Bradley Arts and Sciences Building at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster.

    Workshop topics include pond stocking, fish health, population balance, water chemistry, pond fertilization, aquatic weed identification and aquatic weed control techniques and herbicide alternatives, along with an open discussion to cover other questions. 

  • For children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it’s important for them to control the disease, not let it control them.

    That’s what the staff of the diabetes education clinic at the University of South Carolina at Lancaster will stress at Camp CLAD (Children Learning About Diabetes).

    The free camp is 2 to 4 p.m. June 14-17 at the Carole Ray Dowling Health Services Center and the Gregory Health and Wellness Center at USCL.

  • COLUMBIA – The S.C. Emergency Management Division’s 2010 South Carolina Hurricane Guide is now available in English and Spanish for the entire six-month hurricane season at www.scemd.org.

    The guide is the only officially recognized hurricane preparedness guide for South Carolina and is valid for the 2010 hurricane season, which lasts from June 1 to Nov. 30.

  • Every time Hal Crenshaw looks across the somewhat overgrown field in the middle of an 850-acre tract of private property just off Stacks Road in the Tabernacle community, he knows there is a better way.

    Appearances can be deceiving. That field, with its mixture of red clover, chicory, switchgrass and other prairie grasses is part of finding that better way. It’s not a barren field; it’s a field of dreams.

    An avid outdoorsman, Crenshaw recalls some 35 years ago when this field and many like it were teeming with wildlife.

  • The waters of the Atlantic basin are already warmer than normal and weather forecasters are predicting record warm waters before the year is up.

    That signals an active hurricane season, according The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center.

    The NOAA issued its 2010 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook on May 27.

    The forecast calls for an 85 percent chance of an above-normal hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30.

  • There’s a rocking chair next to the fireplace in Bob and Fran Bundy’s home.

    But this isn’t just any cane-bottomed antique.

    It belonged to Fran’s great- great-grandfather, David M. Johnston. Above the fireplace hangs a framed, hand-stitched South Carolina state flag that was a gift from a group of Barnwell students, given to David’s grandson and Fran’s grandfather, Horace Johnston Crouch.

    Every one of the Bundy’s antiques are personal mementos that weave a family story.

  • One cup of strawberries has only 55 calories. They are a great source of vitamin C, with eight strawberries providing 140 percent of the recommended daily intake for kids.

    However, much of that vitamin C  content can be destroyed when strawberries are prepared for eating through coming in contact with extreme heat or soaking in water too long. They are best eaten as soon as possible.

    Strawberries have anti-inflammatory properties and are used by some to treat anemia, joint disease, hormone imbalances and to strengthen the circulatory system.

  • FORT LAWN – Harold Osborne’s Sunday school class at Second Baptist Church got quite a treat on Sunday morning to go with their coffee.

    They were treated to a Strawberry Punch Bowl Cake, courtesy of Marsha Deerman.

    “I’m gonna find out where she’s going to church,” said a laughing David Jordan, the owner of Jordan’s Farms. “That’s better than the deacons visiting.”