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Today's Features

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    Did you know?

  • As a veteran stage and screen actor, Clarence Felder is serious about every part he plays. In movies, Felder is often called on to play the heavy, tough guy.

    His roles include Herman Goering in the stage performance of “Goering at Nurememberg” and Auschwitiz prison camp Commandant Josef Kramer in the movie, “Playing for Time.”

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  • You don’t have to tell Amanda Ardrey and Mallory McDow that the temperature climbed to almost 95 degrees on Saturday, July 10. The humidity was a stuffy, sticky 95 percent that day, too.

    “It was hot, hot, hot,” said Amanda, 7.

    Hot enough that the two enterprising girls went through six gallons of lemonade at their homemade stand on Freemont Drive in the Arrowood subdivision.

    “We sat there for hours,” 8-year-old Mallory said. “We had a tree and two chairs, so we were OK.”

  • In most cases, bee stings are a minor problem that can be treated at home. Here’s how:

    – A bee will leave behind a stinger attached to a venom sac. Look for a small dark object like a splinter. Try to remove it as quickly as possible with tweezers. The stinger is a self-contained unit that includes a barb, a venom sac and muscles that can continue to pump venom into the bloodstream for 20 minutes after it was left behind. Wasps, yellow jackets and hornets don't leave their stingers in the skin.

  • In the PS2 game, “Garfield: Lasagna World Tour,” the lovable orange cat explores Egypt, Italy and Mexico in search of clues needed to win his weight in his favorite dish.

    In the world of video games, that might work.

    But in real life, Garfield might be headed in the wrong direction. He won’t find a whiff of lasagna in “the Boot,” the Land of the Pharaohs or in the City of Palaces.

    According to the BBC, he would only find his one love in Great Britain.

    That’s right.

    Blimey!

  • Charlie Bundy would rather be safe than sorry.

    If Bundy is out working at his farm in the Tabernacle community or anywhere he might encounter a bee, hornet, wasp or yellow jacket, he will have an emergency epinephrine autoinject (EpiPen) nearby.

    Epinephrine is used to treat life-threatening allergic reactions to insect bites, foods, medications, latex and other allergens.

    “I’m going to be cautious,” Bundy said. “Sometimes, you can spend all day out in the country and not see a soul. You do what you have to do, I guess.”

  • Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • For Bill Stokes, nothing matches the serenity of paddling the Catawba River on a crisp, early fall morning.

    “I can talk about it for hours,” Stokes said. “You arrive at sunrise when there’s a little mist on the water before the crowd gets out. There’s just no better place to watch birds and wildlife.”  

    That love of nature is why Stokes took up kayaking a little more than 12 years ago. He paddles somewhere just about every weekend.

    Sure, it’s a chance to get some exercise and enjoy Mother Nature at her best.

  • Ron Edwards was grateful to see Monday afternoon’s heavy downpour.

    Edwards, general manager of The Springs Farm in Fort Mill, said right now, crops there can use all the rain Mother Nature provides.

    “It’s taken a toll,” Edwards said of the recent heat wave. “The tomatoes and squash will take as much water as you can give them.”

    But the recent rainfall will have very little impact on the ripening peaches that growers are busy harvesting.