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Today's Features

  • According to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue’s 2011 National Barbecue Poll, 70 percent of Americans prefer to cook out over eating out as a way to save money.

    If dad enjoys cooking out, firing up the grill for Father’s Day is a natural, low cost fit. It can be fun, easy and a stress-free way to avoid long restaurant lines.

    Instead of a gift card, new tie, socks or shirt, why not make your dad feel like a king with a great Father’s Day meal that will put a smile on his face?

  • According to the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue’s 2011 National Barbecue Poll, 70 percent of Americans prefer to cook out over eating out as a way to save money.

    If dad enjoys cooking out, firing up the grill for Father’s Day is a natural, low cost fit. It can be fun, easy and a stress-free way to avoid long restaurant lines.

    Instead of a gift card, new tie, socks or shirt, why not make your dad feel like a king with a great Father’s Day meal that will put a smile on his face?

  • Boy, I sure am feeling much safer.  For a few dollars each month I can now protect myself from identity loss.

    Somebody wanting to be me... imagine that. 

    According to the television commercials, somebody out there is just waiting to swipe my credit card and charge thousands of dollars to it. 

    To tell the truth, with my credit score, that would be a real feat, if you get my drift.

    You know, all this identification stuff is sorta hard to grasp.

  • FORT LAWN – Time sure flies. 

    In 1953, Robert “Bobby” Edwards went to work part time for his uncle, Pleas Baker, at Catawba Fish Camp on S.C. 9, after serving a hitch in the U.S. Army as a mess sergeant. He was 24 years old.

    Then in 1968, when Baker retired, Edwards quit a good job at the Rock Hill Bleachery after 23 years and took over the fish camp full time. Edwards was told by a bleachery supervisor that he was making a mistake.   

  • FORT LAWN – Time sure flies. 

    In 1953, Robert “Bobby” Edwards went to work part time for his uncle, Pleas Baker, at Catawba Fish Camp on S.C. 9, after serving a hitch in the U.S. Army as a mess sergeant. He was 24 years old.

    Then in 1968, when Baker retired, Edwards quit a good job at the Rock Hill Bleachery after 23 years and took over the fish camp full time. Edwards was told by a bleachery supervisor that he was making a mistake.   

  • Name: Tori Cunningham

    Age: 16

    Address: Monroe Highway

    Family: Parents, Clarence and Andrea Cunningham; one sister, Jasmine, 24, and a brother, Trey, 14 

    Job: Student, Lancaster High School

    Church: Greater New Hope Christian Association

    Hobbies: Track, basketball and singing 

  • Name: Tori Cunningham

    Age: 16

    Address: Monroe Highway

    Family: Parents, Clarence and Andrea Cunningham; one sister, Jasmine, 24, and a brother, Trey, 14 

    Job: Student, Lancaster High School

    Church: Greater New Hope Christian Association

    Hobbies: Track, basketball and singing 

  • In the late 1700s, there were no neighborhood grocery stores for food or seasonings or pharmacies for medicines in the Waxhaws.

    Self-sufficiency was a critical element of survival for the Scots-Irish settlers who were carving a way of life out of the wilderness.

    That meant most families had a kitchen garden close to the house, where vegetables, fruit and herbs were grown. 

  • In the late 1700s, there were no neighborhood grocery stores for food or seasonings or pharmacies for medicines in the Waxhaws.

    Self-sufficiency was a critical element of survival for the Scots-Irish settlers who were carving a way of life out of the wilderness.

    That meant most families had a kitchen garden close to the house, where vegetables, fruit and herbs were grown. 

  • Almost every day this time of year, a local meteorologist will emphasize the Air Quality Index (AQI) as part of the upcoming weather forecast, but few know what it means.

    The Air Quality Index is the system used to warn the public when air pollution reaches dangerous levels. It tracks ozone (smog) and particle pollution (tiny particles from ash, vehicle exhaust, soil dust, pollen and other air pollutants).