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Today's Features

  • Some legal matters are so important that they make it before the U.S. Supreme Court.

    In 1893, one of the greatest legal cases of all time was put to rest when Chief Justice Melville Fuller and associate judges Stephen Field, John Harlan, Horace Gray, Samuel Blatchford, David Brewer, Henry Brown, George Shiras Jr. and Howell Jackson unanimously ruled that a tomato was indeed a vegetable and not a fruit.

    No, this is not some gag.  The case – Nix v. Hedden – addressed whether a tomato was classified as a fruit or vegetable.

  • For Bill Stokes, nothing matches the serenity of paddling the Catawba River on a crisp, early fall morning.

    “I can talk about it for hours,” Stokes said. “You arrive at sunrise when there’s a little mist on the water before the crowd gets out. There’s just no better place to watch birds and wildlife.”  

    That love of nature is why Stokes took up kayaking a little more than 12 years ago. He paddles somewhere just about every weekend.

    Sure, it’s a chance to get some exercise and enjoy Mother Nature at her best.

  • Ron Edwards was grateful to see Monday afternoon’s heavy downpour.

    Edwards, general manager of The Springs Farm in Fort Mill, said right now, crops there can use all the rain Mother Nature provides.

    “It’s taken a toll,” Edwards said of the recent heat wave. “The tomatoes and squash will take as much water as you can give them.”

    But the recent rainfall will have very little impact on the ripening peaches that growers are busy harvesting.

  •  McKenna Phillips of Elgin community waves to the crowd during the annual Charlesboro Fourth of July parade on Saturday. Charlesboro, Heath Springs and Rich Hill each held their Independence Day parades Saturday. They were held a day early since July 4 is on Sunday this year.

    A group of four-wheelers makes its way down Taxahaw Road in the Charlesboro parade Saturday.

  • The Pageland Watermelon Festival 2010 will be spectacular, offering a variety of fun-filled, family entertainment and events for the young and the young-at-heart.

    Thousands of visitors from throughout the Southeast travel to Pageland every summer to enjoy one of the largest festivals in South Carolina.

    The downtown festivities will kick off at 3 p.m. today. You can enjoy amusement rides, magic shows, the balloon man and other live entertainment in Moore’s Park at the gazebo.

  • Some 19 years ago, Midenna Anderson showed up at the Lancaster County Pool to watch her daughter, Emily Anderson McCain, practice for an upcoming Lancaster Swim Team meet.

    The longtime McDonald Green Elementary School kindergarten teacher said she plopped down in a lounge chair to observe.

    “That was all I was here for,” Anderson said.

    All of that changed when former swim team coach Lynn Hammond saw Anderson sitting there. Anderson readily admits that at that time, she knew little about triple kicks, arm flies and negative splits.

  • By the time Andy Harper made it to the Lancaster County Fruit and Vegetable Growers’ Association Market at Ace Hardware on South Market Street on Wednesday morning, the pickings were slim.

    There wasn’t any okra, squash and cucumbers left.

    But that was OK. Harper still drove off with a bag of hot green and red peppers and 2 pounds of tomatoes grown by Nathaniel and Mae Barber.

    What is different about this market is the crops sold there are grown in Lancaster.

  • Since its introduction in mid-April, Kentucky Fried Chicken has sold more than 10 million of its first-ever bun-less chicken sandwich, the KFC Double Down.

    But the one-of-a-kind sandwich, has sparked a nutritional outcry from critics.

    Why?

    Made with two thick, white meat chicken filets, two pieces of bacon, two melted slices of Monterrey Jack and pepper jack cheese and the “Colonel’s Sauce,” the original version of the Double Down contains 540 calories and 32 grams of fat. By comparison, the grilled version has 460 calories and 23 grams of fat.

  • The menu for 22 residents of Lancaster Children’s Home on Wednesday morning was typical breakfast fare; bacon, ham, eggs, grits and toast.

    But toasting milk in stemware set on tables adorned with fresh flowers, burning candles, name cards?

    That’s not a common sight.

    But it was a sight to stem some table manner confusion, said Annette Deese, Children’s Home director.

    See Lancaster SC’s Peggy Little, with a little help, schooled the group, ages 8 to 17, in former dinner etiquette.

  • Anything is possible.

    In the late 1980s, few people outside the Columbia music scene knew who Mark Bryan, Dean Felber, Darius Rucker and Jim Sonefeld were.

    All of that changed in 1994 when the four, collectively known as Hootie & the Blowfish, released “Cracked Rear View.”

    That musical breakthrough was characterized by the national media as “instant success.”

    But musician and University of South Carolina graduate David Reed knows there is no such thing. It takes more than talent.