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Today's Features

  • Back by popular demand, the Atlanta Sacred Chorale (ASC) is returning to Lancaster.
    The nationally known chorale will present its 2010-11 program, Awake the Dawn, at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 200 W. Gay St.
    The concert is the 14th of the Vivian Major Robinson concert series, sponsored by the Lancaster County Council of the Arts. Concert admission is free, thanks to endowment funding.
    The 40-plus members of the chamber choir, directed by Dr. Eric Nelson, are a mixture of professional and amateur musicians.

  • From Day One, Michael Pardue’s life has been tough.

    He was born with cystic fibrosis, an inherited chronic terminal disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 people in the United States.

    But after struggling with just catching his breath for 24 years, the son of Joey Pardue and Len and Judy Robinson is now breathing a little easier.

    Michael underwent a double lung transplant during eight hours of surgery at the University of North Carolina Hospitals in Chapel Hill on Oct. 1.

  • KERSHAW – Ryan Phillips and Luke Pittman never got the sub sandwiches they were promised on Nov. 1, 2009, when they agreed to ride over into Kershaw County with Luke’s mom, Kelly Pittman, to pick up his younger sister, Grace, who was baby-sitting.

    Kelly’s sandwich bribe was pretty much forgotten about. But what the two boys – Life Scouts in Boy Scout Troop 74 – did that night hasn’t.

  • If you haven’t driven through the College Place subdivision adjacent to the University of South Carolina at Lancaster on Hubbard Drive, you are missing a treat.  

    Not only is the development beginning to fill with beautiful homes, the lawns are immaculately landscaped.

    One of those yards is especially eye-catching and grabbed the attention of Lancaster Garden Club member Joyce Morin.

    Morin said the yard of George and Yvonne Dobson, at 1040 Lyndon Drive, really stands out.  

  • Every teenage girl has her own unique style when is comes to tunes, food, colors and decorations.

    For Andrew Jackson High School sophomore Tori Roberts, that includes country and contemporary Christian music, Caesar salads, green and polka dots.

    With those kinds of tastes, you would think that Tori’s Sweet 16 birthday party at 6 p.m. Saturday at First Baptist Church in Kershaw might include some of those elements.

    After all, a 16th birthday is special and only comes around once.

  • When it comes to giving the body the energy it needs, setting the stage for metabolic function and getting the intestinal tract on track, breakfast is still plain good for you.

    Yet, fewer than half of Americans (about 44 percent) eat breakfast each day, according to the International Food Information Council.

    The reasoning is simple; a morning meal breaks an eight to 10-hour fast and replenishes the body’s supply of blood glucose, which is needed to keep a body going throughout the day.

  • There’s a reason why people lock their doors at night, said Lancaster Fire Department Chief Chris Nunnery.

    “Everyone likes to feel safe in their homes,” Nunnery said.

    But many of these same home-owners don’t check  smoke alarms to make sure they are working properly as an added safety measure.

    And to Nunnery, the principal is the same.

  • Two of Christian music’s favorite voices are coming to Lancaster this weekend.

    Ivan “The Voice” Parker will perform at 7 p.m. tonight at Second Baptist Church as part of the 2010 GlennMark Concert Series.

    Christian recording artist Janet Paschal will sing at 10:30 a.m. Sunday during the morning worship service at Springdell Baptist Church.

    Regularly featured on Bill Gaither’s Homecoming Video and Concert Series, and a member of the Gaither Trio, Parker was the lead singer of Gold City quartet for more than 10 years.

  • During the summer of 2010, there was a host of blessed individuals, churches and organizations that shared bread, skills and time to benefit people served by Kershaw Area Resource Exchange (KARE).

    “Their contributions have made a tremendous difference in how the non-profit serves its clients in the Kershaw area,” said KARE volunteer and treasurer Martha Ussery.

    A portion of a $110,00 grant from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, along with other financial resources, was used to help pay for a new computer system and networking upgrades.

  • It’s estimated the average human brain weighs between 2.25 and 3 pounds.

    The body’s lightweight nerve center of thinking and process has been researched, dissected, cataloged and studied for hundreds of years in an effort to figure out how its amazing parts talk to each other.

    To this day, no one is quite sure how that happens, but now, thanks to a ground-breaking study and report co-authored by Lancaster native Dr. Richard H. Thompson, there is a new way to trace those communication routes.