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Today's Features

  • Three authors who share a common thread that weaves through Lancaster County have recently published books.

    The Rev. Jesse Adams became an author quite unexpectedly.

    Harriett Hodges Diller became an accomplished author years ago and continues to write.

    Malcolm Jones has made a very successful living reviewing books and is now writing his own.

    Here are their stories.

    Adams a reluctant writer

    The Rev. Jessie Adams never imagined he would one day be an author. 

    “I don’t even like to write,” he said.

  • One-handed grabs don’t just apply to the action on the football field. They also apply to the food in the parking lot, before and after the game.

    It’s time to get out the awning, folding table, chairs, coolers, grill and the cornhole game.

    Tailgating – the football season social hour – is finally here.

    It’s hard to beat a day with family and friends at a college or pro football stadium to celebrate a love of the game and to root on your favorite team.

  • Ninety-year-old Sarah Crockett hasn’t lost her zeal for life.

    The great-great-grandmother hasn’t lost her zeal for the camp meeting at Mount Carmel AME Zion Church, either.

    The wagons and buggies Crockett recalls seeing when she came to camp meeting for the first time in 1932, as a 12 year old, are gone. They’ve been replaced by motor homes.

    “Back then, very few people had cars,” she said.

  • Family Promise and local law enforcement are about to get a dose of “Monkey Madness” from Girl Scouts Nicole Hudson and Michaella Oswald.

    The two 14 year olds, members of Girl Scout Troop 3671, have  launched a pajama and stuffed toy drive drive to benefit both as a community service project for their Girl Scout Silver Awards.

    The Girl Scout Silver award is the second highest award Girl Scouts can earn.

  • September and October are the best months to plant cool-season grasses.

    “Labor Day is the time to really start thinking about getting that fall seed out there,” said Brian Beer, Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service agent for Lancaster County.

    But before you get out the seed broadcaster and unroll the garden hose, there’s a little homework to do.

    And this assignment goes a long way in stretching your dollar as well as protecting both time and money.

  • The sun is sinking in the sky a little earlier each evening.

    We’re losing a couple of minutes of daylight each day as autumn draws closer.

    The hot, hazy days of summer are winding down, too, with daily temperatures decreasing.

    It’s a sure sign that Labor Day, college football and fall are on the way.

    Labor Day weekend marks the official end of summer.

    The focus of Labor Day should always be on relaxing.

    That was Congress’ full intention in June 1894 when it enacted the federal holiday.

  • KERSHAW – " Thirteen-year-old Amber Vinson likes math and is pretty good at it.

    The Andrew Jackson Middle School student’s report card is always full of A’s and B’s in every course.

    But math isn’t the only course this eighth grader is getting good at.

    And just like her report card is proof positive of her work in the classroom, those pink and black Ferrini Stingray Tiger Western boots she wears to school each day show that Amber is getting pretty good at ripping through the barrels, too.

  • Ann Robertson made a decision years ago.  After recovering from a stroke and later being diagnosed with fibromyalgia, her doctor told her that her future was in her own hands. 

    She learned that while the fibromyalgia would be painful, she could choose to be active and deal with the pain or let the pain control her.

    She chose to be active. Part of her active lifestyle includes planning and maintaining one of the prettiest yards in Lancaster.

  • American food has always been a melting pot. While that’s true in every region of the country, it’s especially true in Hawaii.

    Its cuisine is a kaleidescope of tastes that came about from ethnic groups that immigrated there.

    A fusion of cultures – American, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Polynesian and Portuguese – come together on the island state.

    Many of those immigrants imported plant and food sources with them when they relocated to the volcanic island.

  • For years, I’ve heard cooking experts extol the virtues of using fresh herbs to transform ordinary meals into extraordinary meals.

    That kind of talk got my attention.

    But instead of picking fresh herbs at the grocery store, I decided to grow my own.

    Guess what? They were right.

    I have become a planter box cook, with basil, rosemary and thyme growing right outside our back door.

    They not only boost flavor, they also allow you to cut back on salt, fat and sugar to allow for a cleaner taste.