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Today's Features

  • There’s a reason why people lock their doors at night, said Lancaster Fire Department Chief Chris Nunnery.

    “Everyone likes to feel safe in their homes,” Nunnery said.

    But many of these same home-owners don’t check  smoke alarms to make sure they are working properly as an added safety measure.

    And to Nunnery, the principal is the same.

  • Two of Christian music’s favorite voices are coming to Lancaster this weekend.

    Ivan “The Voice” Parker will perform at 7 p.m. tonight at Second Baptist Church as part of the 2010 GlennMark Concert Series.

    Christian recording artist Janet Paschal will sing at 10:30 a.m. Sunday during the morning worship service at Springdell Baptist Church.

    Regularly featured on Bill Gaither’s Homecoming Video and Concert Series, and a member of the Gaither Trio, Parker was the lead singer of Gold City quartet for more than 10 years.

  • During the summer of 2010, there was a host of blessed individuals, churches and organizations that shared bread, skills and time to benefit people served by Kershaw Area Resource Exchange (KARE).

    “Their contributions have made a tremendous difference in how the non-profit serves its clients in the Kershaw area,” said KARE volunteer and treasurer Martha Ussery.

    A portion of a $110,00 grant from the J. Marion Sims Foundation, along with other financial resources, was used to help pay for a new computer system and networking upgrades.

  • It’s estimated the average human brain weighs between 2.25 and 3 pounds.

    The body’s lightweight nerve center of thinking and process has been researched, dissected, cataloged and studied for hundreds of years in an effort to figure out how its amazing parts talk to each other.

    To this day, no one is quite sure how that happens, but now, thanks to a ground-breaking study and report co-authored by Lancaster native Dr. Richard H. Thompson, there is a new way to trace those communication routes.

  • The average American eats 25 pounds of rice per year.

    A healthy, versatile and economical staple around the world, rice made its first appearance in the new world in the late 1680s, according to the USA Rice Federation.

    Rice lore has it that a storm-battered ship sailed into Charles Town (Charleston).

    To pay the colonist for repairing his ship, the captain gave the small quantity of “Golde Seed Rice,” which was named for its color, to a Lowcountry planter.

  • Happy Lee Ferree was wearing two smiles at Carolina Motorsports Park in Kershaw on Wednesday.

    One, painted on his helmet, is a testament to the name given him by his parents, Patty, and the late Dennis Ferree. 

    “They named me that because they never thought they could have a child,” the Grass Valley, Calif., native said.

    The second smile, worn inside his helmet, is a testament to why the 24-year-old Snap-On Tools Pro Truck Series driver was in Kershaw this week to start with.

  • For Missouri’s Sara Evans, every little piece of the puzzle doesn’t always fit.

    But it’s a puzzle that she’s putting back together.

    Sidelined by a bitter divorce in 2006 after 13 years of marriage, the traditional singer whose heartfelt songs hit close to home will perform inside the Bundy Auditorium at the University of South Carolina at 7:30 p.m. Friday.

    Since arriving on Nashville’s Music Row in the early 1990s, the soulful Evans has put together a string of hits that is hard to match.

  • Each weekday morning, a group of men meet inside the Humana Cafeteria on Main Street to discuss the ills of the world, the weather, college football, crime and politics between sips of hot coffee.

    “This is one of the places I get my marching orders from,” said Lancaster Mayor Joe Shaw, who is a “first-shift regular,” along with Charlie Bundy, Larry Cauthen, former Sheriff Wilford Faile and Donald Hunter.

    They arrive some time between 7:30 and 8 a.m. and leave just before 9 a.m. when the “second shift” reports in.

  • Back in the woods off John Everall Road, nestled beneath a stand of hardwood trees beside a meadow of fresh cut hay is a very special place.

    You can’t see it from the road. For that matter, you can’t even see it from Nancy Westmoreland’s back yard.

    But if you follow the pasture pathway that her dad, Bill Westmoreland, keeps mowed to get there, you’ll find it once you know where to look.

    The seven rings of patterned, jagged quartz rock in the edge of the woods didn’t appear like a magical crop circle. This is no publicity stunt.

  • The discovery of a family cemetery has led to the placing of a monument at another cemetery.

    On Sunday, the Hammond family will officially add a marker at the Rich Hill Baptist Church cemetery, 1557 E. Doc Garris Road, Heath Springs.

    The dedication service starts just after Sunday morning worship.

    Several Hammond descendants are buried at Rich Hill Baptist Church and Hammond family reunions are held there.

    The marker includes the names of American Revolution soldiers Raleigh Hammond and his son, Capt. Samuel Hammond.