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Today's Features

  • There are millions of meatloaf recipes, including the fool-proof one your grandma came up with years ago.

    Regardless of ingredients, two factors make meatloaf the ideal comfort food.

    First, it’s quite economical and can feed a family of six for less than $10. 

    According to Chris Kimball, editor and chief of “Cook’s Illustrated” and host of “America’s Test Kitchen,” hard times have made meatloaf an economical,  low-cost chic dish to serve at dinner parties. 

  • “The Big C” – cancer – is no respector of age, race, or gender.  

    Cancer can affect anyone, anywhere at any time. Chances are it has touched your life in some way whether it was through a loved one, friend, or even yourself.

    The fact was evident Saturday by the presence of the 180-plus cancer survivors ranging from age 91 to 4, at the Relay for Life birthday dinner held at Covenant Baptist Church.   

  • Now let’s be honest. Age has its embarrassing moments. 

    Just the other day, I ran into a long-lost friend. 

    He walked up, shook my hand and said he was glad to see me. Shucks, we had not crossed paths since the 1950s.

    We’re about the same age and I was sure glad to see him, though our chance encounter was somewhat embarrassing. 

    For the life of me, I couldn’t recall his name and I am so ashamed. 

  • Age: 42

    Address: Taxahaw Road

    Family: A son, Wayne Blakeney Jr., 18, and a daughter, Shanequal Blakeney, 19  

    Pets: A dog, Spot

    Job: Lancaster County Maintenance

    Church: Rose Hill Baptist Church

    Hobbies: Fishing and playing pool

    Favorite book: The Bible

    Favorite movie: Any comedy

  • Age: 42

    Address: Taxahaw Road

    Family: A son, Wayne Blakeney Jr., 18, and a daughter, Shanequal Blakeney, 19  

    Pets: A dog, Spot

    Job: Lancaster County Maintenance

    Church: Rose Hill Baptist Church

    Hobbies: Fishing and playing pool

    Favorite book: The Bible

    Favorite movie: Any comedy

  • When Grace and Clyde Steele moved into their home at 1206 Trailstream Drive nine years ago, the 3-acre lot was filled with trees, leaving little space for sunshine to touch the ground.  That’s the way her daughter, Cindy McDonald, liked it. Cindy previously lived in this home with her husband, Jimmy, and their children. After her family moved to Myrtle Beach, the house stood empty for about six years.  

  • When Grace and Clyde Steele moved into their home at 1206 Trailstream Drive nine years ago, the 3-acre lot was filled with trees, leaving little space for sunshine to touch the ground.  That’s the way her daughter, Cindy McDonald, liked it. Cindy previously lived in this home with her husband, Jimmy, and their children. After her family moved to Myrtle Beach, the house stood empty for about six years.  

  • There was no electricity or assembly line available to help with the process. 

    Rather, he used a vice called a shaving horse to shape wood into eating utensils, furniture and other items found around the house.

    It took patience and a steady hand to make a spoon or a jug from a piece of stock wood in Colonial America. But the shaving horse was the best option for American settlers in the 1700s. 

  • “Dive…dive…” 

    These words are familiar to anyone who has ever seen a Hollywood film about a submarine. The words are always followed by a warning signal and the unmistakable sound of “a-rooo-ga, a-rooo-ga.”

  • Most folks my age will never forget how Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, changed our lives forever.

    For you youngsters, that’s the day the Japanese attacked our naval installation, Pearl Harbor.

    That was one rough month for me.

    Reality sunk in when Sears, Roebuck & Co. canceled my order for a J.C. Higgins Roadmaster Deluxe bicycle because someone in Greensboro thought it would be needed by the Army to fight the enemy.

    I still bet somebody whose daddy worked for Sears got my bicycle for Christmas.