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Remember When

  • Mr. Dunn knows a bargain for sure

    My sweet tooth was aching. Bless Pete, a big, old Buffalo nickel-sized Baby Ruth candy bar would surely ease the pain.

    I wasn’t financially embarrassed, but I was short on funds. All I had jingling in my pocket was three or four brownies.

    I couldn’t fight off the urge any longer. Mr. James Hinson’s store was up the street past Mr. Hubbard’s place, right across the street from Marion Tennant’s.

    I guess I had to settle for some penny candy bars.

  • Storage space never lasts

    The genuine metal storage building I recently put together is just about full.

    You know, for some reason, I have trouble parting with a lot of my stuff.

    I’ve always been that way, which is no big secret around our house.

    After all, a man’s toys are a man’s toys and his plunder house is his castle.

    Toys are like old friends.

    We’re supposed to hang on to them as long as we can.

    My wife has been knowing that ever since she helped my parents pack and move from Chesterfield Avenue to Bell Town a number of years ago.

  • I found a friend in the carnival swing man

    They called it a carnival. For me, it was more or less a county fair wannabe.

    This small outfit popped into town during the lull of my summer vacation.

    It only had about three or four rides and all of them were old, but it was something to do.

    Rides aren’t everything, I guess.

    There was a midway sideshow featuring the dog-faced man, a fat woman and a fella who could swallow swords.

    Why, they even had what one of the fellas called a “hootchy-kootchy show.”

  • A cattle baron I'm not

    Uncle Walter grew tired of running a service station and decided to take up the cattle business.

    He wasn’t content to just raise a few head on his Highway 903 spread, either.

    Uncle Walter was really into it; the two concrete silos you rode by going to the beach were proof. They were his.

    Uncle Walter even hauled cows to the sales in Columbia and Mineral Springs on a regular basis.

  • It's always best to get the lay of the land

    You can get into trouble when you don’t know the territory.

    Two brothers who lived down the street, their cousin from Arch Street, and me had a fishing trip all figured out.

    Now, this fishing hole boasted a right nice cabin where we could all spend the night.

    The oldest member of our quartet did the driving and as planned, we arrived just before sundown.

  • B-25's can still get the best of me

    I got an up-close look at a refurbished U.S. Army Air Corps B-25 bomber at a recent air show in Maryland.

    In keeping with its legacy, crew members dressed in the World War II flight suits.

    Powered by two propeller driven engines, the B-25’s huge twin stabilizer tail was painted with white stars signifying it as an American war plane, that thing was quite a sight.

    A quick tour revealed an almost strange plainness of the B-25’s interior.

  • In Boy Scouts, you learn about snipes on your own

    My best buddy’s mama, Mrs. Ellie Pipkins, was a den mother and leader of  our neighborhood Cub Scout Pack.

    Cub Scouts get to do some stuff, but nothing like the older Boy Scouts of America.

    Most us were already experienced campers, but Cubs couldn’t go camping overnight. We could have back yard cook-outs and sharpen our knot-tying skills, but that was about it.

    I guess you could say, that made us Boy Scouts in training.

    First Baptist Church sponsored Boy Scout Troop 70 and a bunch of my Sunday School friends were already members.

  • Oh well, it’s better crate than never

     

    Oh well, it’s better crate than never

    During our recent visit to Maryland, we made regular stop by the Amish open air market between La Plata and Lexington Park. 

    I like that place. The vegetables aren’t in yet, but flower baskets and fresh, cut flowers are in abundance.

  • An apple pie never goes out of style

    It had been as hot as a firecracker all week.

    Truck convoys loaded with soldiers were a common sight, with maneuvers in full swing.

    The Red and Blue armies invaded Lancaster from opposite directions. Campsites were set up wherever thee was a hint of a shade tree.

    The fellas were making the best of it, too, roaming around from one group of GI’s to another.

  • My robe smells like old curtains

    The economy was good. All the mills were running three shifts full tilt, with jobs available to those who showed interest in becoming lint heads.

    As a soon-to-be 1951 graduate of Lancaster High School, I was about to achieve a milestone in a textile town; I was about to get my high school diploma.

    It’s what I had been working hard for and was the one highlight for my years of schooling.

    It was a good time; the 1950’s were just getting off the ground and great things were ahead, or so we thought.

    But last summer, war started in far off Korea.