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Home and Garden

  • Backwoods farming

    In the late 1700s, there were no neighborhood grocery stores for food or seasonings or pharmacies for medicines in the Waxhaws.

    Self-sufficiency was a critical element of survival for the Scots-Irish settlers who were carving a way of life out of the wilderness.

    That meant most families had a kitchen garden close to the house, where vegetables, fruit and herbs were grown. 

  • Understand Air Quality Index colors

    Almost every day this time of year, a local meteorologist will emphasize the Air Quality Index (AQI) as part of the upcoming weather forecast, but few know what it means.

    The Air Quality Index is the system used to warn the public when air pollution reaches dangerous levels. It tracks ozone (smog) and particle pollution (tiny particles from ash, vehicle exhaust, soil dust, pollen and other air pollutants).

  • May Yard of the Month

    Growing up, Stuart Graham attended Van Wyck Presbyterian Church with his family.  
    Just two doors down from there stood a bright yellow home known throughout the tight knit community as the old Hyatt house.  
    At the time, Graham never realized the keys to the 1898 Victorian-style home at 5154 Old Hickory Road would one day be in his pocket.
    Graham had always admired the house and was excited to learn in 2003 it was to be sold at an auction.

  • March Yard of the Month

    When Grace and Clyde Steele moved into their home at 1206 Trailstream Drive nine years ago, the 3-acre lot was filled with trees, leaving little space for sunshine to touch the ground.  That’s the way her daughter, Cindy McDonald, liked it. Cindy previously lived in this home with her husband, Jimmy, and their children. After her family moved to Myrtle Beach, the house stood empty for about six years.  

  • Childhood memories

    Childhood memories mean a lot to David and Tammy Funderburk.
    That concept is what the Funderburks focused on when landscaping their yard at 610 W. Shiloh Unity Road.
    They are hoping that vision goes a long way in helping their children, Holly, 28, and Rod, 21, and grandchildren, Gunnar, Drake and Alyson, build some special memories, too.   
    They had no idea their efforts would get them recognized in the local community.
    The Lancaster Council of Garden Clubs selected the Funderburks’ yard as  Yard of the Month for October.

  • Cathy Hendrick to speak at Douglas

    There aren’t many people around whose lives haven’t been touched in one way or another by cancer. It is no respecter of person, race, creed or income. Take Cathy Hendrick for instance. She could be the “Job” of our generation. Her life was changed forever on Oct.

  • Replace smoke detector batteries when you fall back

    A smoke detector doubles your chances of surviving a home fire, but only if it works.  That’s why the Lancaster County Fire Chiefs Association is reminding residents to change the batteries in their smoke detectors this weekend to coincide with the 2 a.m.

  • Talking to roses not a thorny subject for Mary Daniels
  • Bruins seek to rebound

    Lancaster High School head football coach Bennie McMurray is hoping for a little deja vu as he looks to Friday night.McMurray, recalling the Bruins’ response to their first loss this season, is hoping for a similar answer following LHS’s second setback this fall.Lancaster, after falling to Northwestern 27-7 for its first defeat this season, rebounded to throttle Nation Ford 30-0 at home.“This time, it’s different,” McMurray said. “We’re on the road and we face a team which is playing pretty good football.

  • Buford students tackle 1M pages and win state reading award

    There were are a lot dedicated readers at Buford Middle School over the summer.

    In fact, the students and faculty read more than 1 million pages and have recently been recognized for their work.

    Buford Middle is this year's statewide winner of the No Book Left Unread summer reading contest. The initiative started last year as a way to encourage recreational reading during the summer.

    More than 8,000 students and 173 schools in South Carolina participated in this year's challenge, reading nearly 16 million pages.