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Home and Garden

  • Gardening is her passion

    Charis Grabbe, 14, has a green thumb and a state 4-H gardening award to prove it.

    Charis took home first place in the 2017 S.C. 4-H Small Garden Project’s junior division for Lancaster County, the Midlands Region and the state. 

    She is the first overall state winner from Lancaster County in any 4-H project area.

  • Going solar

    Going green, whether for the environment or the green in your wallet, is becoming easier in Lancaster County. More and more homeowners are going solar and cutting their power bills by 25 to 50 percent.

    Nearly half a dozen residents with recently installed glossy black panels on their rooftops talked about their savings last week. Some own and some lease the photovoltaic or solar electric equipment. They all saved a lot of cash.

  • No garden spot, no problem

    The United Way Community Garden gives entire families a way to grow their own fresh produce.

    The garden is member-only, but is open to all Lancaster County residents and is free to use. Free seeds and plants are provided to those who need them.

    The United Way of Lancaster County writes grants and partners with local businesses to make the garden possible. 

  • Bring the outdoors in with sunrooms and porches

    Amanda Harris
    For The Lancaster News

    Local residents are finding ways to enjoy the outdoors without the elements.
    Sun City Carolina Lakes resident Theresa Gahren’s custom-built, screened-in porch allows her to enjoy the outdoors, no matter the season or weather.
    “We love it,” she said. “It’s an extension of the inside, outside.”
    Gahren enjoys sitting on her extended patio with her German shepherds and uses her porch for eating meals, napping and reading.

  • Granddad builds custom playhouses

    Kayla Vaughn
    The Lancaster News

    What started out as a request for a cardboard cutout train for a birthday party prop grew into a playhouse project in the hands of Lancaster grandfather Justin McDaniel.
    McDaniel took the idea of the cardboard cutout train and expanded it into a wooden train playhouse.
    “I thought that if we made one out of wood, it would last longer,” McDaniel said.

  • 4-H project teaches youth gardening skills

    Kayla Vaughn
    The Lancaster News

    Some kids have green thumbs, and other are all thumbs, but Lancaster County 4-H has a program that can teach any of them to garden.
    The 4-H small garden project sets them up with seeds and plenty of help in getting them well on the way to successful gardening.
    By growing gardens of their own, youth involved in the 2016 4-H small garden project experienced first-hand what it means to grow their own food.

  • Don’t commit ‘crape murder’

    Spring is in the air and pruners are in hand.
    Your crape myrtles might look a bit scraggly from last year’s growth, but before you commit what one local landscaper calls “crape murder,” please proceed with caution.
    Crape myrtles, a landscaping staple across the South, were introduced to the Palmetto State in the late 1700s by the French botanist Andre’ Michaux. The multi-trunked trees have smooth bark and produce a canopy of crepe-like petals in pink, white or purple. They have a long summer blooming period.

  • Rain gardens combat floods, erosion, handle storm runoff

    CLEMSON – The Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service and Carolina Clear have launched an initiative to help property owners install rain gardens to mitigate potential flood damage and help protect S.C. water quality.

  • Destructive blight found on tomatoes in Beaufort

    Clemson University

    Late blight disease, the most destructive and infectious disease affecting tomatoes and Irish potatoes, has been reported this week on tomatoes in a home garden in Beaufort County.
    The diseased plants have been destroyed, but further spread of late blight to other areas of South Carolina is likely if the fungal-like pathogen arrived via spores blown up from Florida. To make matters worse, the cool, cloudy and wet weather in large parts of the state created ideal conditions for escalation.

  • No place like home for the holidays

    Three Lancaster families will ring in the holiday spirit Dec. 6 for the Lancaster Garden Club’s 29th annual Christmas Tour of Homes. That 2015 seasonal soundtrack includes hoots with  Christy and Doug Barnes, family laughter with Gwen and Audrey Curry and the make-believe march of toy soldiers with Clara and Rusty Reed.

    Do you hear what we hear?