Food and Fun

  • Arts Scene

    October is National Arts and Humanities Month.

    Founded in 1960, Americans for the Arts is the nations’ leading non-profit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. In addition to providing a rich array of programs that meet the needs of over 150,000 members and stakeholders, the programs are dedicated to representing and serving local communities to create opportunities for every American to participate in and appreciate all forms of the arts.

  • Pieces of home

    In most any situation or circumstance, the people best qualified to help others are those who have been through the same or very similar situations or circumstances. That’s why Leslie Murphy, a disabled veteran of the United States Marine Corps, founded the Carolina Veterans Commission, a non-profit organization based in Lancaster.

  • Change up chili with smoky, zesty chipotles

    Hail to the chipotle chile pepper! Chipotles are smoked jalapenos and are commonly found in grocery stores, either as a powder in the spice aisle or in cans with aromatic adobo sauce in the ethnic foods aisle.

    Home cook Sandi Sheppard adds flavor and flair to her pork chili recipe with these tantalizing chile peppers, along with fresh jalapenos and canned chipotle-spiked white corn. Fresh cilantro sprinkled on top cools it down.

  • 'Food deserts' a growing concern for S.C. residents

    WEST COLUMBIA — Hundreds of thousands of people across South Carolina live in communities where access to supermarkets or large grocery stores is beyond reach. In agricultural terms, such areas are called “food deserts” — communities where healthy, affordable food is difficult to obtain.

    “For a growing population, healthy foods are much harder to come by in the modern world,” Clemson University professor Dave Lamie said. “For many, they sadly are beyond reach.”

  • 2012 Red Ribbon Week national contest announced

    From release

  • Lancaster Pregnancy Care Center honors volunteers

    The Lancaster Pregnancy Care Center held an appreciation dinner for its volunteers on Thursday, Sept. 25, at the Historic Lancaster County Courthouse.

    More than 70 invitations were sent out to community residents who operate as liaisons between the community, their home church and the pregnancy center, said Julie Walters, who was named Executive Director of the center three months ago.

  • Fall into soups this season

    There are so many reasons to love this time of year: cooler temperatures, chunky sweaters and trees ablaze in color.

    But perhaps most thrilling of all – at least to us comfort foodies – is the arrival of soup season.

    And to kick the season off right, there’s no more decadent starter recipe than Amber Franks’ Potato Bacon Soup.
    A rich and silky combination of all things creamy, Amber achieves her pot of perfection by incorporating two different types of prepared soup bases and a full brick of cream cheese.

  • Ratcliffe still makes a difference

    INDIAN LAND – How often have you found yourself wanting to make a difference?

    BJ Ratcliffe is a person who has done just that—she has made a difference.

    As a registered dietitian, Ratcliffe knows the importance of fresh foods. She also knows that having access to them can be challenging. Educating the public to the benefits from fresh produce can be a full-time job. That is exactly how she spent many years of her career.

    Ratcliffe was a nutrition educator at the Mecklenburg County Health Department for 18 years.

  • Snappy Orange Marmalade Cake

    3 cups cake flour
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 cup butter, softened
    2 and 1/4 cups sugar, divided
    3 large eggs, at room temperature
    1 tablespoon orange zest
    1 and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
    1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature
    1 cup fresh orange juice
    1- 12 oz. jar orange marmalade

    3/4 cup heavy cream, chilled
    3 tablespoons sugar
    3/4 cup sour cream, chilled

  • FWBC honors senior members with banquet

    From release
    The members of First Washington Baptist Church, 1300 E. Meeting St., honored their senior members at a banquet in June.

    In 1996, Rev. Frank Butler, pastor at First Washington Baptist came up with the idea of a program for senior members of the church.

    An advisory board headed by Mrs. Mary B. Mackey and Mrs. Reola McGriff brought the idea to life through The Golden Agers. McGriff served as The Golden Agers first president.