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Food and Fun

  • Cupcakes make a comeback

    By now, some of you are still running around trying to find the perfect Mother’s Day gift. Finding something that’s fresh, foolproof and made with love may be closer than you think.

    It’s not in the shopping mall; it’s cupcakes made fresh from the kitchen cabinet.

    We’re talking flour, sugar, baking soda and butter, blended with the love that every mother appreciates.

  • Tabernacle Chili cook-off heats up Relay for Life

    When Stephen Wright decided to enter the Tabernacle United Methodist Church Chili Cook-off on April 12 to benefit the 2008 Relay for Life, he had a plan.It wasn’t much of a plan, but it was a plan.“I told ‘em, I’d probably be better off to go by Wendys, buy a bunch of chili, put it in a pot and try to fake out everybody,” he said, laughing.

  • Former Miss S.C. to speak at National Day of Prayer luncheon

    The Lancaster faith community is encouraged to attend the Fifth Annual Lancaster Community Prayer Luncheon on May 1 at Covenant Baptist Church, 165 Craig Manor Road.

    This year’s keynote speaker is Kelly McCorkle Parkison, who served as Miss South Carolina 2002 and participated in the television reality show, “Amazing Race.”

    In addition to McCorkle Parkison, the service will include prayers offered to God for our families, churches, our government leaders, military and civil servants and our nation said Dr. Bert Welch, Covenant senior pastor.

  • Old-fashioned cast-iron cooking still has place in modern kitchen

    There's a shiny, new cast-iron skillet above the refrigerator in our kitchen. But that's about to change; I'm ready to knock that sheen off by seasoning it and putting it to good use.

    To me, the pride of every southern kitchen is still a cast-iron skillet.

    In a day when stainless, copper-coated cookware is the rage, that old dark skillet has lost its appeal to many.

    Why?

    I'm not really sure, considering that it can be used for a wide array of roasting, frying, sauteing and baking.

  • See colonial cooks in action Saturday at AJ Birthday Celebration

    When Scots-Irish settlers migrated to the Carolinas in the 18th century, they brought familiar names like Lancaster, Chester and York with them.

    They also brought what they had learned from cooking in the open hearths of their homes in Ireland and the Pennsylvania settlements.

    Those attending the annual Andrew Jackson Birthday Celebration on Saturday at Andrew Jackson State Park will get a brief glimpse of colonial cooking from demonstrations by the Cooking Guild of the Catawba Valley.

  • Feasting on God's word; inspiration, ingredients for Scripture Cake found in Bible verses

    No one knows when or where the idea for Scripture Cake came from, but its ingredients are rooted in Bible verses.

    The late Charlemae Hill Rollins believed it was so significant in her own life that she included the recipe for it in her book, "Christmas Gif': An Anthology of Christmas Poems, Songs and Stories, Written by and about Negroes."

    Disappointed that there were so few written resources about the Christmas traditions she learned as a child in Yazoo City, Miss., Rollins wrote the anthology in 1963 to pass along what she had learned from her grandmother, a slave.

  • Girl Scout cookies coming in this week

    The two month wait is over. A shipment of more than 35,000 boxes of Caramel deLites, Cinna-Spins, Lemonades, Peanut Butter Patties, Peanut Butter Sandwich, Shortbread, Thanks-A-Lot and Thin Mints arrived here late Saturday.

    Eager local Girl Scouts from 25 troops and their leaders met a tractor trailer stacked high with some of America's favorite cookies at St. Luke United Methodist Church to unload them.

    Nobody around town is happier about that than J.R. Snipes. For Snipes, it's cookie time.

  • Love at first bite; Impress sweetheart with home-cooked meal

    It's less than 24 hours to V-Day and the pressure is on.

    If you're tired of standing in a last-minute line to fight for picked-over flower bouquets, cards, syrupy stuffed animals and boxes of candy, take heart.

    Nothing goes further than a homecooked meal for your sweetheart on Valentine's Day.

    Men, the findings of a recent Cosmopolitan magazine survey should pique your curiosity.

    That survey showed that 70 percent of women prefer a dinner cooked by a man than one from a five-star restaurant.

  • Think outside the oatmeal box

    While oatmeal is one of the healthiest breakfast foods around, it's looked on with disdain by many.

    A co-worker recently told me "the best thing you can do with oatmeal is to give it to someone else," commenting on her dislike of it.

    "I can't stand the texture of it," she said. "It's just yucky."

    Her hatred of oatmeal doesn't diminish its body-boosting properties. A half-cup of rolled oats has more than a high fiber content, says weight loss expert Elaine Magee.

  • Folic acid can give babies a healthier start

    It does take a little extra effort for a mother-to-be to eat healthy, but it has its benefits for her and the baby she's carrying. After all, she is eating for two.

    One of the most important nutrients pregnant women need is folic acid, a B-vitamin that is needed to ensure proper cell growth. It helps the neural tube (the part of the developing baby that becomes the brain and spinal cord) develop properly.