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Food and Fun

  • USCL's untapped resource

    Diabetes has been in the national spotlight in the last two weeks, thanks to Paula Deen.

    The “Queen of Southern Cuisine” came out of the kitchen broom closet on national television by admitting she has Type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes.

    Diagnosed in 2008, Deen didn’t made her condition public until Jan. 17, while simultaneously revealing she is the new paid spokesperson for a non-insulin Type 2 diabetes medication for adults.

  • Reason to celebrate

    I have to hand it to the estimated 7,700 residents of Rockland, Maine.

    They saw snow Monday, ice pellets on Tuesday and went outside this morning to a temperature of about 7 degrees.

    In the upcoming days, the residents of the coastal town will see more snow and rain. Weather like that doesn’t generate many smiles. It’s not something to celebrate.

    But Rockland residents will be celebrating Sunday afternoon with its annual Pies on Parade to commemorate National Pie Day on Monday.

  • Slow cookers speak a universal language

    Having a successful career means a lot to Stephanie O’Dea. 

    But in the big picture, being a successful mom means more, especially when that family includes three children under age 10, including one with Celiac disease (gluten intolerant).

    But can you have both? 

    Absolutely.

    How else can you explain a cookbook on the New York Times best-selling list for six weeks and national TV appearances, as well as feature stories in “Real Simple Magazine and “Woman’s World?”

  • Don't be afraid to substitute herbs and spices

    Don’t be afraid to substitute herbs and spices

    From time to time, every cook gets into a pinch when there is no pinch of cumin in the cupboard.

    Before going out to buy more, see if there are other alternatives that will work just as well. 

    It not only saves money, but eliminates waste by using another herb or spice in a way that serves the same purpose. It could also keep you from buying a herb or spice you will only use once. 

  • An early surprise

    Terrell Springs started off 2012 by making a mad dash to Lancaster from Great Falls in the wee hours of the morning.

    No, the trip wasn’t in the New Year’s Day  plans of he and his girlfriend, Ashley Boulware. However, their daughter, Telia Alani Springs, couldn’t wait.

    “I had the emergency flashers on all the way,” he said. 

  • Today's Recipe

    Chef Nancy Hughes hopes you’re hungry.

    The author of “15-Minute Diabetic Meals” and the “The 4-Ingredient Diabetes Cookbook” has put together an easy-to-make Molasses Drumsticks with Soy Sauce recipe that’s finger-licking, lip-smacking good.

    “The molasses gives it a deep, earthy sweetness. It’s like a real dark, rummy brown sugar,” Hughes said in an instructional video posted on the American Diabetes Association website.

  • Game On!

    A simple food suited for paper plates and disposable utensils has once again become the rage in trendy, high-end restaurants.

    Sliders – small, three-bite burgers – have two personalties, said David Gerard Hogan, a professor of American history at Heidelberg College in  Ohio.  

    According to Hogan, author of “Selling ’em by the Sack: White Castle and the Creation of American Food,” sliders have become a “bifurcated” food, enjoyed by both the upscale and working class.    

  • As we break bread – Christmas 2001 in the New Normal: Part 3

    Editor’s note: Cole Waddell is a Lancaster resident who was living in New York City during the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. He moved back here in 2005. This is the third part of a three-part series about Southerners who shared Christmas dinner there each year.

     

    Six months after Dec. 25, 2001, finds me cleaning out my Aunt Ellen’s  accumulation of cards and notes.  

    One card is from Mrs. Boyce, a lady she knew.  

  • Baking on a budget

     

    The holiday season is hectic enough without fretting over what to buy for whom and how much to spend on gifts for coworkers, friends, neighbors and teachers. 

    Homemade cookies can make a lasting impression.

    According to a recent survey, 40 percent of consumers plan to spend less this year on holiday gifts. Holiday baking is a great way to tighten your budget without shrinking your gift list.

    Here are a few tricks and techniques to ensure sweet success this baking season.

  • One dish breakfasts simplify holiday meals

    When family comes home for holidays, the big meal of the day always gets the brunt of the attention.

    However, by working ahead, you can wake sleepy heads with an aroma from the kitchen and a memorable Christmas breakfast they will remember this time next year.

    Here are a few tips to consider before your house fills up with guests: