.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Faces and Places

  • EMS a rewarding experience, career

    My start in EMS began when I joined the Unity Volunteer Fire Department. My chief was Dennis Robinson. Dennis was so cool during the most devastating disasters. He never got excited. He was not only a fire chief, but a hazardous material specialist, rescue-certified in many fields and an EMT basic. When I completed my fire training, I wanted to be like Chief Robinson and learn everything I could about fire and EMS.

  • Bundy wanted to help those in need

    I      was working on tugboats on the Intracoastal Waterway when we heard a call over the radio from the boat in front of us.
    “Tug Royal engineer, my husband has fallen behind the wheel and is unconscious. I don’t know what to do.”
    We pulled over to the boat and performed CPR on the man until the Coast Guard and Marine Corps helicopter arrived.

  • I want to be able to save lives

    There is a 1-year-old child choking; what would you do to help? There is a 34-year-old man who collapses while walking; would you know what to do? These types of events can happen to anyone at any time. Do you know how to handle a situation of that kind?
    I am a 26-year-old Hispanic man who loves to help anyone, no matter where they are from or who they are. When someone is in need of help, I want to be the one who can make a difference or even save his or her life.

  • EMS left big impression on boy

    When I was very young, I remember the day when my great aunt was extremely sick and EMS was called to her home. My mother, several other family members and I were with her. When EMS arrived, they were working diligently and tenaciously to help her in her time of need. I remember, even at a young age, how impressed I was with how they treated her and the family.

  • Right turn changed my life forever

    Finding my way to Lancaster County EMS was the result of a quick right turn into an EMS station one day while on a family reunion trip to my brother’s home in Indian Land. Most paramedics have a curiosity about other EMS systems in areas they are visiting and I am no different. Usually I find a system that is woefully in need of better equipment, medical protocols and better personnel.

  • EMS, medics always seemed like second family

    In 1976, my mother married my stepfather, Robert Johnson, who was an EMT and shift supervisor with Lancaster County EMS. During the next several years, I read all of his EMT and medical books, which gave me my initial interest in EMS.

  • Always wanted to be street medic

    I initially received my training as an EMT through the military while deployed during Desert Storm as a hospital corpsman in the Navy in 1991. I also volunteered with Bethune Rescue Squad. When Springs Industries plant in Kershaw began its reduction in the workforce, I sought and found full-time employment with Kershaw County EMS as an EMT. I advanced to the intermediate level and eventually became a paramedic/supervisor.

  • EMS has made me a better medic, person

    I became an EMT so that I could pay it forward. When I was 21, I had two small children and was a widow, due to a tragic accident. I don’t  remember a lot about the day my husband was killed, but the one thing that I do remember was an EMT held my hand, hugged my neck and stayed with me until my  family got to hospital. The very same EMT came to the funeral to pay respect.
    Three years later my, mother was diagnosed with Stage 4 breast cancer and died. Once again, I had another experience with another EMT.

  • Mom wanted to set example for her sons

    In the fall of 2006, I was the stay-at-home mother of two boys – Matt, 12, and Mason, 4. With my youngest child starting kindergarten the following year, I felt it was time for me to think about going back to work. Most of my work experience was in retail, and frankly, I had no desire to return to it. This was a new opportunity to me, and I wanted a career – not just a job, but a career that would set a good example for my boys and make them proud of their mom.

  • Join us for Red Rose Festival fun

    Downtown Lancaster is celebrating the arrival of spring on May 18 and 19 with the Red Rose Festival. Now in its third year, the rain-or-shine festival offers a chance to come to relax with great music, food and activities.
    Events include outdoor concerts, arts, crafts, a kids zone, car show, karate showcase and Radio Disney fun, along with roaming entertainment and more.
    Join us from 5 to 10 p.m. on Friday, May 18, and 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, May 19, in beautiful historic downtown Lancaster.