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‘Separation of church and state’ not in Constitution

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I would like to respond to Merrel Wilkenfeld’s letter, “Radical right should embrace whole Constitution,” in the Sept. 4 edition of The Lancaster News.
I am a conservative and also a Christian. And I wholeheartedly believe that every law-abiding citizen has the right to bear arms, whether it’s one shotgun to use for hunting, or 100 pistols, rifles and shotguns, along with thousands of rounds of ammunition in my safe. As long as they’re legal, it’s nobody’s business – including the government or anyone else.
If that makes me a member of the radical, religious right, then so be it. If my memory serves me correctly, our country was founded by gun-toting, religious, conservatives who are probably turning over in their graves as they watch the mockery that has been made of the Constitution to which Mr. Wilkenfeld refers.
No where in my copy of the Constitution are the words “separation of church and state.” They’re just not in there. The Constitution actually says that the government cannot establish a religion, as the rulers of England had done, and that the government could not interfere with the practice of anyone’s religion.
Thanks to the interpretation by some of our judges, we’ve gone from the government not interfering to total interference. At the insistence of real radical groups like the ACLU and others, our children have to walk outside the school to pray around the flag pole.
The name of God, Jesus or Christ cannot be mentioned in a prayer at a football game. My grandson, a first-grader in public school, can’t say the blessing aloud at the risk of offending someone else.
Is this what we want? Is this what our Founding Fathers wanted? I don’t think so. But, if we radical, religious right-wingers don’t speak up, we’re going to lose our freedoms a little at a time until we wake up one morning and they’re all gone and we’re sitting there wondering how it happened.
Maybe it’s time that we all embraced the Constitution – the original version.

Fred C. Steele
Lancaster